Ambassador Princeton Lyman, the U.S. special envoy to Sudan and South Sudan, on April 23 spoke to a group of students at USIP's Academy for International Conflict Management and Peacebuilding. The students were attending the Academy's Two Sudan course, running this spring from April 23-April 26

U.S. Envoy to Sudan, S. Sudan Addresses USIP's Academy

Ambassador Princeton Lyman, the U.S. special envoy to Sudan and South Sudan, on April 23 spoke to a group of students at USIP's Academy for International Conflict Management and Peacebuilding.  The students were attending the Academy's Two Sudan course, running this spring from April 23-April 26.

The four-day course, taught by Matthew Levinger and Linda Bishai, provides students a better understanding of the complex environment and operating conditions of the two Sudans and enables practitioners and analysts to work more effectively in the region.  Students in the course apply conflict analysis techniques and frameworks to case studies drawn from live situations in the two Sudans.  

Lyman's discussion came at a time of increased hostilities between Sudan and South Sudan. The ambassador had just returned from a trip to Juba, the capital of South Sudan, and Khartoum, Sudan.

Since 2005, USIP experts have focused on helping to build peace and stability in Sudan, working through partnerships with the U.S. Department of State, nongovernmental organizations in Sudan, and key stakeholders.

Lyman was a senior fellow at USIP from 1999-2000 and is the author of "Partner to History: The U.S. Role in South Africa's Transition to Democracy," published by USIP Press in 2002.

Explore Further

Related Publications

Q&A: Sudan, South Sudan Wars--Special Envoy Needed?

Q&A: Sudan, South Sudan Wars--Special Envoy Needed?

Thursday, September 14, 2017

As the war in South Sudan rages on, its dynamics are influenced by events across the border in Sudan and by the policies of neighboring countries, regional groups and the broader international community, notably the U.S. It’s just the kind of situation that cries out for an American diplomat with the stature and the ability to work across borders to help resolve the myriad conflicts underlying the fighting, according to former Special Envoy to Sudan and South Sudan Princeton Lyman and two other former diplomats.

Global Policy; Mediation, Negotiation & Dialogue

Effectively Fighting Corruption Without Violence

Effectively Fighting Corruption Without Violence

Wednesday, August 30, 2017

By: Nicholas Zaremba; Tabatha Thompson

In 2013, musicians, artists and activists began what became one of Africa’s most successful grassroots political movements, The Citizen’s Broom (Le Balai Citoyen). Organized to fight corruption in Burkina Faso, the campaign brought thousands of people into the streets with brooms to “sweep them clean” and highlight longtime President Blaise Compaore’s illegitimate attempts to maintain power.

Nonviolent Action; Democracy & Governance

Africa Peacekeeping: Lessons from a Ghanaian Commander

Africa Peacekeeping: Lessons from a Ghanaian Commander

Monday, March 28, 2016

By: Fred Strasser

For peacekeeping forces in Africa, the days of simply patrolling a ceasefire line or keeping local armies apart are over. Their assignments today increasingly include protecting civilians, confronting violent extremism and even engaging in what amounts to counter insurgency. These new burdens demand better preparation of troops headed for missions and clearer thinking by those who send them, Ghanaian Army Colonel Emanuel Kotia, a leading trainer of African peacekeepers, said at a U.S. Institute of Peace forum.

Conflict Analysis & Prevention; Justice, Security & Rule of Law; Education & Training; Human Rights; Global Policy; Fragility and Resilience

View All Publications