The major attacks in Kabul this week have renewed questions on how well the country can deal with such challenges and also meet civilian needs ahead of the security transition in 2014.

The major attacks in Kabul this week have renewed questions on how well the country can deal with such challenges and also meet civilian needs ahead of the security transition in 2014. 

To address this and other issues, Ken Yamashita, USAID's mission director to Afghanistan, and Greg Huger, USAID Afghanistan senior development officer, visited the U.S. Institute of Peace on April 16 for an off-the-record discussion. 

Yamashita (center) and Huger (pictured right) provided on-the-ground perspectives of how recent events in Afghanistan are affecting civilian assistance.  They also discussed how USAID is focusing its program toward increasing Afghanistan's resilience to withstand the economic, security and governance challenges associated with the transition and drawdown of international forces slated for 2014. 

Andrew Wilder (pictured left), director of USIP's Afghanistan and Pakistan programs, moderated the roundtable discussion.   

In his opening remarks Wilder highlighted USIP's efforts through events like this to bring greater awareness and understanding of the critically  important political and economic transitions that Afghanistan faces during the coming years, at a time when most policy and media attention is focused on the security transition

Learn more about USIP's on the ground work in Afghanistan.

Related Publications

Redefining Masculinity in Afghanistan

Redefining Masculinity in Afghanistan

Thursday, February 15, 2018

By: Belquis Ahmadi; Rafiullah Stanikzai

Following more than three decades of political instability, violent conflicts, and foreign invasions, Afghanistan is home to nearly two generations that have grown up knowing only conflict and war. As a result, violent and aggressive behavior—particularly from young men—has become an accepted norm of...

Gender

To Stabilize Iraq After ISIS, Help Iraqis Reconcile

To Stabilize Iraq After ISIS, Help Iraqis Reconcile

Sunday, February 11, 2018

By: USIP Staff; Nancy Lindborg; Sarhang Hamasaeed

An international conference opens in Kuwait Monday to plan ways to rebuild Iraq and secure it against renewed extremist violence following the three-year war against ISIS. A USIP team just spent nine days in Iraq for talks with government and civil society leaders, part of the Institute’s years-long effort to help the country stabilize. The Kuwait conference will gather government, business and civil society leaders to consider a reconstruction that Iraq has said could cost $100 billion. USIP’s president, Nancy Lindborg, and Middle East program director, Sarhang Hamasaeed, say any realistic rebuilding plan must focus also on the divisions and grievances in Iraq that led to ISIS’ violence and that still exist.

Conflict Analysis & Prevention; Violent Extremism

View All Publications