Does poor governance promote extremism?  With the support of USIP, the Governance Institutes Network International (GINI), a Pakistani non-governmental organization based in Islamabad, will conduct surveys of 2,000 adults in three areas to explore potential links between misgovernance and radicalization and gain insight into the supply-side dynamics of misgovernance.

Does poor governance promote extremism? Pakistan is a critical test case of the possible relationship between the two. The country is in the grip of an escalating terrorist insurgency. At the same time, it suffers from severe deficiencies in governance, including high levels of corruption and failure to deliver essential social services. Whether citizens who experience poor governance are more likely to hold extremist views or participate in terrorist movements is an important question in understanding drivers of violence in Pakistan. However, empirical research on connections between the two is sparse.

With the support of USIP, the Governance Institutes Network International (GINI), a Pakistani non-governmental organization based in Islamabad, will conduct surveys of 2,000 adults in Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA), Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa (KP) province, and the former Malakand Division to explore potential links between misgovernance and radicalization and gain insight into the supply-side dynamics of misgovernance. Survey results will be shared with government stakeholders at nine focus group discussions in the three regions.

The grant will shed light on possible links between misgovernance and extremism in Pakistan, disseminate findings to officials about the consequences of misgovernance, and develop policy options to address governance challenges that are shown to be drivers of extremism. The grant also aims to create potential space for dialogue between local service providers and citizens that allows them to begin resolving conflicts and building peace.

More from USIP

Related Publications

Could Pakistan’s Protests Undercut Taliban and Extremism?

Could Pakistan’s Protests Undercut Taliban and Extremism?

Tuesday, April 17, 2018

By: James Rupert

Tens of thousands of ethnic Pashtuns have held mass protests in Pakistan in the past three months, demanding justice and better governance for their communities. The largely youth-led protests forged an organization, the Pashtun Tahafuz Movement (“tahafuz” means “protection”), that has broadened its goals to include democracy and decentralization of power in Pakistan. The movement reflects demands for change among the roughly 30 million Pashtuns who form about 15 percent of Pakistan’s population, the country’s second-largest ethnic community.

Conflict Analysis & Prevention; Nonviolent Action; Violent Extremism

Devolution of Power in Pakistan

Devolution of Power in Pakistan

Wednesday, March 28, 2018

By: Syed Mohammed Ali

Passage of the eighteenth amendment to Pakistan’s constitution in 2010 was rightly hailed as a major accomplishment. Not only did it devolve significant powers from the central government to the provinces, it also mandated the formation of local governments to bring government closer to the people. It took half a decade for the provinces to set up local governments—and real decision-making authority and financial resources have been even slower to arrive. In this Special Report, Syed Mohammad Ali takes stock of Pakistan’s devolution process and why its success is critical to the long-term prospects of democracy and the cultivation of new generations of democratic leaders.

Democracy & Governance

View All Publications