Students will simulate the meeting in Geneva to explore possibilities for the resolution of the Sri Lankan conflict and the subsequent reconstruction of Sri Lankan society.

Sri Lanka: Setting the Agenda for Peace

Scenario

The setting for this simulation is a September 2001 meeting in Geneva at which the government of Sri Lanka and the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Elam (LTTE) are to explore avenues for resolving their conflict. What gives this meeting particular urgency is a donor threat to cut off aid unless the Sri Lankan government shows a willingness to explore political solutions. Donors have also indicated they may enact legislation banning LTTE fund-raising activities in their respective countries. The international community's threat to use economic pressure to end the violence has changed the status quo of the conflict, and offers a rare window of opportunity for peace.

In role-playing representatives of the parties to the conflict, various political parties, concerned states, and other organizations considered to be major stakeholders in the conflict, participants will attempt to forge an acceptable agenda that can serve as the basis for peace talks.

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Sri Lanka: Setting the Agenda for Peace
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