Join us for 60 days of learning to highlight the connections among youth, peace and gender equality. We’ll celebrate the stories of young women and men working for peace, and we’ll exchange crucial skills and approaches for building more inclusive societies. 

Spotlight Video

Are you a youth working to promote gender equality? Do you have a story to share? Film a 1-2 minute video answering the questions below. Tweet your video at #YouthPeaceEquality and you may end up as one of our spotlight videos.

  • In what ways do you promote gender equality through your work?
  • What is important to you about promoting gender equality?
  • What is an experience in your life that helps us understand why you focus on inclusion in your work?

For Nada, Azza, and Nourhan, acceptance into the Maadi STEM School in Cairo was a dream come true. Only 120 students are chosen from across Egypt. In every region in the world, women and girls are underrepresented in science, technology, engineering, and math, denying them opportunities in education, entrepreneurship and finance that could help break the cycle of poverty.

Today’s generation of youth, at 1.8 billion, is the largest the world has ever known. Because many of them live in countries ravaged by violent conflict, the world too often sees boys or young men only as perpetrators of violence, and young women or girls as victims. But they also can be constructive agents for peace, and one prerequisite for peace is equality -- in education and in leadership. #YouthPeaceEquality

Photo Galleries

View photos of youth around the world working to create inclusive societies.

Gender Self-Assessment

Reflect on how you approach gender in your daily life. Set goals to become more intentional in your efforts toward gender equality.

Online Learning

Participate in exercises around gender and explore content from USIP’s online course on gender and peacebuilding.

Related Publications

U.K. Secretary Talks History, Equality on International Women’s Day

U.K. Secretary Talks History, Equality on International Women’s Day

Wednesday, March 13, 2019

By: Anthony Navone

This year marks a full century since American women won the right to vote, lending particular resonance to 2019’s International Women’s Day. For USIP President Nancy Lindborg and her guest, Penny Mordaunt, the U.K. secretary of state for international development and minister for women and equalities, the March 8 celebration was an ideal moment to reflect on women’s progress in their countries and globally and to highlight remaining obstacles to women’s full participation in society.

Gender; Global Policy

Afghanistan Talks: No Women, No Peace

Afghanistan Talks: No Women, No Peace

Friday, March 1, 2019

By: Belquis Ahmadi

As talks between the U.S. and the Taliban raise hopes for peace in Afghanistan, the country’s women fear another—and related—possibility: That their hard-won rights to participate in the nation’s political and economic life could again be washed away by the Taliban’s rigid views on gender.

Gender; Peace Processes

How can we negotiate with the Taliban? Afghan women know.

How can we negotiate with the Taliban? Afghan women know.

Thursday, February 7, 2019

By: Palwasha L. Kakar

Afghan political leaders met in Moscow this week with Taliban representatives amid new momentum in diplomatic efforts to end Afghanistan’s war. Like other recent discussions, including those between U.S. envoy Zalmay Khalilzad and Taliban representatives in Qatar, Afghan women remain almost entirely excluded. Yet mostly unnoticed amid the formal diplomacy, Afghan women at their country’s grass roots already have managed negotiations with local Taliban leaders.

Gender; Peace Processes; Religion

Kathleen Kuehnast on the 2018 Nobel Peace Prize Winners

Kathleen Kuehnast on the 2018 Nobel Peace Prize Winners

Thursday, December 20, 2018

By: Kathleen Kuehnast, Ph.D.

Highlighted by the 2018 Nobel Peace Prize award to Dr. Denis Mukwege and Nadia Murad—advocates for survivors of wartime sexual violence—the issue of sexual abuse has gained international recognition. USIP’s Kathleen Kuehnast attended the ceremony, saying, “People were standing in solidarity to what they were hearing. We can no longer be indifferent about this type of criminal activity.”

Gender

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