Join us for 60 days of learning to highlight the connections among youth, peace and gender equality. We’ll celebrate the stories of young women and men working for peace, and we’ll exchange crucial skills and approaches for building more inclusive societies. 

Spotlight Video

Are you a youth working to promote gender equality? Do you have a story to share? Film a 1-2 minute video answering the questions below. Tweet your video at #YouthPeaceEquality and you may end up as one of our spotlight videos.

  • In what ways do you promote gender equality through your work?
  • What is important to you about promoting gender equality?
  • What is an experience in your life that helps us understand why you focus on inclusion in your work?

For Nada, Azza, and Nourhan, acceptance into the Maadi STEM School in Cairo was a dream come true. Only 120 students are chosen from across Egypt. In every region in the world, women and girls are underrepresented in science, technology, engineering, and math, denying them opportunities in education, entrepreneurship and finance that could help break the cycle of poverty.

Today’s generation of youth, at 1.8 billion, is the largest the world has ever known. Because many of them live in countries ravaged by violent conflict, the world too often sees boys or young men only as perpetrators of violence, and young women or girls as victims. But they also can be constructive agents for peace, and one prerequisite for peace is equality -- in education and in leadership. #YouthPeaceEquality

Photo Galleries

View photos of youth around the world working to create inclusive societies.

Gender Self-Assessment

Reflect on how you approach gender in your daily life. Set goals to become more intentional in your efforts toward gender equality.

Online Learning

Participate in exercises around gender and explore content from USIP’s online course on gender and peacebuilding.

Related Publications

For the Afghan Peace Process to Work, Women Must be Involved

For the Afghan Peace Process to Work, Women Must be Involved

Monday, October 29, 2018

By: Belquis Ahmadi; Marjan Nahavandi

The bottom line is Afghan women want peace and they want to have a say in how it is negotiated. Without women at the negotiation table, a long-term and inclusive peace is dramatically less likely. Indeed, studies show that the inclusion of women in peace negotiations, leads to peace agreements that are representative of the needs of the people they affect and, therefore, more sustainable.

Gender; Peace Processes

If we want to build peace, we can’t keep women out.

If we want to build peace, we can’t keep women out.

Thursday, October 18, 2018

By: Danielle Robertson; Tabatha Thompson

When nations affected by violent conflict try to make peace, the evidence is clear on what works. For a durable peace agreement, women must be included throughout the process. While the U.N. Security Council unanimously endorsed that goal in 2000, women still are excluded from peace processes. Among 504 peace accords signed by 2015, only 27 percent even mentioned women. A U.N. study of 14 peace processes from 2000 to 2010 found that women comprised only 8 percent of negotiators and 3 percent of signatories.

Gender; Peace Processes

Gender Inclusive Framework and Theory

Gender Inclusive Framework and Theory

Thursday, August 23, 2018

By: Kathleen Kuehnast, Ph.D.; Danielle Robertson

The Gender Inclusive Framework and Theory (GIFT) guide is an approachable and thorough tool that facilitates the integration of gender analysis into project design. Because peacebuilding work is context dependent, the GIFT puts forth three approaches to gender analysis – the Women, Peace and Security Approach; the Peaceful Masculinities Approach; and the Intersecting Identities Approach – that each illuminate the gender dynamics in a given environment to better shape peacebuilding projects.

Gender

A New Afghan Law Preserves ‘Virginity Tests’ for Women

A New Afghan Law Preserves ‘Virginity Tests’ for Women

Tuesday, July 24, 2018

By: Marjan Nahavandi; Muzhgan Yarmohammadi

Afghanistan this year adopted a new penal code that moves the country toward meeting international standards on criminal justice. At the same time, it underscores the continued difficulties of reinforcing rights for Afghan women and girls. One reflection of this is its preservation of the discredited practice of “virginity testing”—a decision that Afghan women increasingly have opposed.

Gender

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