We are pleased to announce that through coordination with ARTWORKS Projects and funding by The Compton Foundation, USIP and its partners have created a 12-minute video that will serve as a way to communicate and highlight internationally the main takeaways and key issues covered in the three-day symposium, “Missing Peace: Sexual Violence in Conflict and Post-Conflict Settings,” held February 14 -16, 2013 at USIP.

The United States Institute of Peace (USIP), the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute North America (SIPRI North America), the Peace Research Institute Oslo (PRIO), and the Human Rights Center at the University of California, Berkeley in February 2013 convened a group of scholars, policymakers, practitioners, military personnel and civil society actors to examine the issue of sexual violence in conflict and post-conflict settings, identify gaps in knowledge and reporting, and explore how to increase the effectiveness of current responses to such violence.

The three-day symposium, from February 14-16, resulted in the production of a 12-minute video through the coordination with ARTWORKS Projects and funding by The Compton Foundation. This video highlights key takeaways and messages from the symposium, and serves as a way to communicate internationally the key issues covered. The Missing Peace Symposium video is a compilation of invaluable insights from the scholars, policymakers, practitioners, and military and civil society actors who contributed to the remarkable effort and continue to contribute to this issue worldwide in conflict and post-conflict settings.

Related Publications

Invaluable, Yet Too Often Invisible: Time to Recognize Women Building Peace

Invaluable, Yet Too Often Invisible: Time to Recognize Women Building Peace

Thursday, December 12, 2019

By: Nancy Lindborg

On a recent visit to Colombia, I visited a deeply moving space for reconciliation, Fragmentos, where the guns of the FARC have been hammered into a beautiful rippling floor by many of the women who suffered terribly during the conflict. It was a powerful reminder that though women often bear the greatest burden during times of war, they are also often leaders on the path to peace. In my three decades of doing this work, I’ve repeatedly been humbled by the women I’ve met who have risked their lives and found creative ways to build peace—from women forming neighborhood councils in Syria and Iraqi women securing their legal rights through relentless efforts, to grandmothers riding around on motorbikes to intervene in local disputes in Kenya.

Type: Blog

Gender

What Policymakers Can Learn About Gender from Terrorists

What Policymakers Can Learn About Gender from Terrorists

Monday, November 18, 2019

By: Leanne Erdberg Steadman

The road to violent extremism is neither simple nor predictable, with diverse motivations and discrete, individual paths. No singular profile accurately describes all those who decide to join. Millions of people may experience similar situations and live in similar contexts but never join an extremist group, while some people will join who would we would not deem at risk. This makes preventing and countering violent extremism exceptionally difficult. It’s an even more intractable task when gender is an afterthought, or worse, gender is used to justify over-simplified, one-size-fits-all approaches.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Gender; Violent Extremism

First Lady Rula Ghani on Afghan Women’s Consensus

First Lady Rula Ghani on Afghan Women’s Consensus

Friday, November 15, 2019

By: USIP Staff

As Afghans, the United States and the international community seek an end to the war in Afghanistan, the country’s first lady, Rula Ghani, says thousands of Afghan women nationwide have expressed a clear consensus on two points. They insist that the war needs to end, and that the peace to follow must continue to build opportunities for women. The single greatest step to advance Afghan women’s cause is education and training to build their professional capacities, Ghani told an audience at USIP.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Gender; Peace Processes

View All Publications