We are pleased to announce that through coordination with ARTWORKS Projects and funding by The Compton Foundation, USIP and its partners have created a 12-minute video that will serve as a way to communicate and highlight internationally the main takeaways and key issues covered in the three-day symposium, “Missing Peace: Sexual Violence in Conflict and Post-Conflict Settings,” held February 14 -16, 2013 at USIP.

The United States Institute of Peace (USIP), the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute North America (SIPRI North America), the Peace Research Institute Oslo (PRIO), and the Human Rights Center at the University of California, Berkeley in February 2013 convened a group of scholars, policymakers, practitioners, military personnel and civil society actors to examine the issue of sexual violence in conflict and post-conflict settings, identify gaps in knowledge and reporting, and explore how to increase the effectiveness of current responses to such violence.

The three-day symposium, from February 14-16, resulted in the production of a 12-minute video through the coordination with ARTWORKS Projects and funding by The Compton Foundation. This video highlights key takeaways and messages from the symposium, and serves as a way to communicate internationally the key issues covered. The Missing Peace Symposium video is a compilation of invaluable insights from the scholars, policymakers, practitioners, and military and civil society actors who contributed to the remarkable effort and continue to contribute to this issue worldwide in conflict and post-conflict settings.

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