Through this initiative, the Centers of Innovation for Science, Technology, and Peacebuilding and Media, Conflict and Peacebuilding explored ways to utilize quantitative and analytical tools to map online discourse and content in USIP's priority conflict areas.

Ukraine Protest
Photo Credit: The New York Times/ Sergey Ponomarev

As part of this initiative, the Center put on major conferences that have brought together a wide range of leading academic and industry experts. It produced three PeaceWorks reports that laid out an influential framework for analyzing the impact of new media on politics and which took stock of the existing literature, methods, and data. These conferences and reports have significantly advanced a broad, collective, and collaborative effort to develop policy-relevant and academically rigorous approaches to urgent questions about the impact of new media on conflict and peace.

2014 Events and Publications

  • Public Event: Twitter Evolutions: The Changing Role of Social Media in War and Protest
    In this half-day conference, the U.S. Institute of Peace and the George Washington University's Institute for Public Diplomacy and Global Communication hosted two panels of experts on social media's role in political protest and civil war across the Middle East and Europe as part of a discussion on the latest Blogs and Bullets report: Syria's Socially Mediated War.

2013 Events and Publications

2012 Events and Publications

2011 Events and Publications

2010 Events and Publications

2009 Events and Publications

Related Publications

Nonviolent Action and Peacebuilding: Contradictory or Complementary?

Nonviolent Action and Peacebuilding: Contradictory or Complementary?

Monday, January 27, 2020

By: Maria J. Stephan; Jonathan Pinckney

Since Martin Luther King, Jr. Day last week, the nonviolent action team here at USIP has been reflecting on what Dr. King’s life and legacy teach us about the deep links between nonviolent action and peacebuilding. As we watch protesters in Hong Kong, Iraq, or Lebanon directly confront their governments, there may not seem to be much connection between people hitting the streets and building lasting peace. But for King, the connection was inevitable and inseparable, and practitioners of both disciplines have much to offer one another.

Type: Blog

Nonviolent Action

The Challenges for Social Movements in Post-Mugabe Zimbabwe

The Challenges for Social Movements in Post-Mugabe Zimbabwe

Wednesday, January 22, 2020

By: Gladys Kudzaishe Hlatywayo; Charles Mangongera

Civil society and social movements have long been at the center of pushing back against corruption and authoritarian practices. Zimbabwe was no exception in the run-up to the November 2017 coup d’état that ousted Robert Mugabe after four decades of unaccountable rule. This report, based on in-country interviews and focus group discussions, examines the transition that followed the coup to draw broader lessons for how the international community can support, without harming, grassroots nonviolent action initiatives in countries undergoing profound political shifts.

Type: Special Report

Nonviolent Action

The Latest on Iran’s Evolving Protests

The Latest on Iran’s Evolving Protests

Thursday, January 16, 2020

By: Garrett Nada; Maria J. Stephan

Iran has been rocked by a series of developments in recent months, from the mass protests over raised fuel prices to the killing of powerful Iranian commander Qassem Soleimani. Over the weekend, protesters returned to the streets, spurred by the military’s mistaken downing of a Ukrainian passenger jet. As in past protests, like 2009, the government has met demonstrators with a draconian and violent response. USIP’s Garrett Nada and Maria Stephan explain how the protests have evolved over time and how demonstrators could use nonviolent tactics against the repressive regime.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Democracy & Governance; Nonviolent Action

View All Publications