The U.S. Institute of Peace is pleased to announce a partnership with the World Affairs Councils of America to engage U.S. communities in discussions on the building of peace abroad as a practical way to strengthen America’s security. While violence worldwide fuels extremism and uproots millions, national and local peace agreements from Colombia to Iraq show how even bitter conflicts can be ended nonviolently.

The World Affairs Councils form the United States’ largest non-profit, grassroots organization dedicated to educating and engaging Americans on global issues. Through dozens of chapters in 40 states, the group’s programs reach more than half a million Americans each year.

This fall, local World Affairs Councils will host USIP experts for a series of activities in Tennessee, Florida and Missouri. In the inaugural event, USIP President Nancy Lindborg will join the Tennessee World Affairs Council in Nashville for a public, town hall-style forum at Belmont University, as well as other discussions at the Nashville Rotary Club and at local high schools.

“We can think of no better partner than the World Affairs Councils of America to connect global policy experts with Americans who are deeply interested in the critical global issues of our times, ” said Lindborg.

This is not the first collaboration between USIP and the World Affairs Councils. Each year, the Institute adds a peace and conflict section to the group’s Academic WorldQuest, a contest engaging more than 4,000 American high school students in quizzes that test their knowledge of global affairs.

Related News

In Memoriam: George H.W. Bush

In Memoriam: George H.W. Bush

Saturday, December 1, 2018

News Type: Announcement

The U.S. Institute of Peace mourns the death of America’s 41st president, George H.W. Bush, who guided the United States and the international community through the collapse of the Soviet Union, the end of the Cold War and a reduction in the superpowers’ nuclear arsenals.

In Memoriam: Betty Bumpers

In Memoriam: Betty Bumpers

Monday, November 26, 2018

News Type: Announcement

The U.S. Institute of Peace mourns the death of Betty Bumpers, a schoolteacher, First Lady of Arkansas and adept political campaigner whose work promoted a reduction of tensions and nuclear weaponry during the Cold War, elevated the voices of American women in policymaking, and improved health for children. Bumpers tirelessly pursued her campaigns among American political leaders in Congress and several presidential administrations, and at the grass roots, in living rooms and local schools nationwide. From her home in Little Rock, Arkansas, Bumpers founded a citizens’ campaign, called Peace Links, that grew to national and global prominence. Bumpers served as a member of the U.S. Institute of Peace Board of Directors.

View All News