Tabatha Thompson is a senior program officer with the Program on Nonviolent Action, where she leads the program’s Synergizing Nonviolent Action and Peacebuilding (SNAP) training and coaching efforts and amplifies grassroots voices and lessons learned in the U.S. government and global policy space.

Prior to joining USIP, Thompson managed leadership development programs at the Partnership for Public Service, a nonpartisan nonprofit focused on making the federal government work more effectively. During this time, Thompson also led DC’s largest all-volunteer anti-human trafficking nonprofit, DC Stop Modern Slavery, where she worked to raise awareness and promote community action to combat trafficking in the greater Washington area.

Thompson holds a master’s degree with a focus on human rights, humanitarian policy, and conflict resolution from Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs and a bachelor’s degree in international affairs and modern languages from the Georgia Institute of Technology. She is a member of Women of Color Advancing Peace, Security, and Conflict Transformation, where she co-chairs a Redefining National Security sub-group bridging the civil society-military community divide.

Publications By Tabatha

Four Takeaways on the Intersection of Nonviolent Action and Peace Processes

Four Takeaways on the Intersection of Nonviolent Action and Peace Processes

Thursday, May 13, 2021

By: Jonathan Pinckney; Miranda Rivers; Tabatha Thompson; Adam Gallagher

How can nonviolent action and peacebuilding work together? And how can they be brought together to promote positive long-term political change? Although mass nonviolent action movements are taking place at an increasingly rapid rate, they are succeeding in achieving their goals less frequently, and where initially peaceful demonstrations have been met by state violence from Myanmar to Colombia, better understanding these questions is crucial.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Nonviolent Action; Peace Processes

Afghan Grassroots Activists Could Help Build a Lasting Peace

Afghan Grassroots Activists Could Help Build a Lasting Peace

Thursday, May 7, 2020

By: Mohammad Ehsan Zia; Tabatha Thompson

Since the U.S.-Taliban deal was inked at the end of February, progress in the Afghan peace process has stalled due to disagreements over prisoner releases and complicated by an ongoing political dispute over last year’s presidential election. And now Afghanistan must confront a COVID-19 outbreak. But, the logjammed top-down peace process is only one piece of the puzzle to ending the country’s long-running conflict: there’s also the grassroots.

Type: Blog

Nonviolent Action; Peace Processes

Conflict Prevention in Kenya: Combating Corruption through Nonviolent Action

Conflict Prevention in Kenya: Combating Corruption through Nonviolent Action

Wednesday, September 25, 2019

By: Tabatha Thompson; Hussein Khalid

The relationship between corruption and violent conflict is complex and significant. Corruption affects access to basic services, contributes to resource scarcity, and fuels organized crime. It was included on a European Commission checklist for the root causes of conflict, and it was cited as a potential driver of extremism in the 2019 report of the Task Force on Extremism in Fragile States. Focusing on several social movements in Kenya, this report reviews the efforts of collective civic action to combat corruption and advance transparency, accountability, and good governance.

Type: Special Report

Nonviolent Action; Democracy & Governance

If we want to build peace, we can’t keep women out.

If we want to build peace, we can’t keep women out.

Thursday, October 18, 2018

By: Danielle Robertson; Tabatha Thompson

When nations affected by violent conflict try to make peace, the evidence is clear on what works. For a durable peace agreement, women must be included throughout the process. While the U.N. Security Council unanimously endorsed that goal in 2000, women still are excluded from peace processes. Among 504 peace accords signed by 2015, only 27 percent even mentioned women. A U.N. study of 14 peace processes from 2000 to 2010 found that women comprised only 8 percent of negotiators and 3 percent of signatories.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Gender; Peace Processes

How the United Nations Can Harness 'People Power'

How the United Nations Can Harness 'People Power'

Tuesday, March 20, 2018

By: Tabatha Thompson; Maria J. Stephan

The United Nations has declared a priority this year to unify and strengthen its work in building peace—and U.N. bodies will meet in the next two months to advance that change. U.N. leaders have acknowledged that a vital element in peacebuilding is nonviolent, grassroots movements. But as the United Nations aims to more efficiently promote peace, how prepared is it to actually work with them?

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Nonviolent Action

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