Nick is a senior program specialist with the Program on Nonviolent Action, where he focuses on research and training and education for nonviolent action in Sudan and South Sudan. Prior to this role, Nick supported USIP’s Learning, Evaluation, and Research team as a research assistant. Before coming to USIP, Nick worked for the Kaizen Company in Liberia as a program officer for a project called Mitigating Local Disputes in Liberia; and managed a large pool of NGO clients to support their research and grant development needs with Hanover Research.

Nick’s research interests exist within the broader field of conflict transformation. He most recently conducted field-based research on the integration of religious minorities in Malta with George Mason University’s School for Conflict Analysis and Resolution. Additionally, he has conducted research for USAID on external interventions to foster social cohesion in post-conflict states.

Nick holds a Master’s degree in Conflict Resolution from Georgetown University and a certificate in Refugees and Humanitarian Emergencies from Georgetown University’s School of Foreign Service. Nick received his Bachelor’s degree in Government from the College of William & Mary.

Publications By Nicholas

In South Sudan, Civic Activists Take On COVID

In South Sudan, Civic Activists Take On COVID

Wednesday, July 15, 2020

By: Nelson Kwaje; Nicholas Zaremba

For South Sudan, COVID-19 is simply the newest plague. The world’s youngest country already faces civil war, repression, displacement, economic collapse, climate change, hunger—even swarming locusts. South Sudan’s people enter the fight against COVID under nearly the worst conditions of human development, and with 39 percent of them displaced by warfare. With a government that has been unable to provide even basic services, South Sudanese must rely on their emerging civil society, and international partnerships, to organize much of their response to the pandemic. Yet COVID now threatens vital international help for such grassroots campaigns.

Type: Blog

Nonviolent Action; Global Health

People Power’s Transformative Role in America’s National Reckoning

People Power’s Transformative Role in America’s National Reckoning

Monday, June 22, 2020

By: Miranda Rivers; Nicholas Zaremba; Maria J. Stephan

Since the murder of George Floyd, protests against police brutality and anti-Black racism have shaken the United States, with shockwaves reverberating around the world. Demonstrators have come out in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and over 1,600 towns and cities across the country, representing the broadest protests in U.S. history. Elsewhere, there have been global solidarity protests for Black Lives Matter and demonstrations calling for an end to racism in Tunis, Pretoria, Rio de Janeiro, Seoul, and dozens of other cities around the world. The Black-led popular uprising has led to a national reckoning on the issue of systemic racism and police brutality against Black people in the United States.

Type: Blog

Nonviolent Action

In South Sudan, Nonviolent Action is Essential to Building Peace

In South Sudan, Nonviolent Action is Essential to Building Peace

Friday, February 22, 2019

By: Maria J. Stephan; Nicholas Zaremba

On September 12 of last year, South Sudan’s president, Salva Kiir, signed the Revitalized Agreement on the Resolution of Conflict in South Sudan (R-ARCSS) with South Sudan People Liberation Movement in Opposition chairman Dr. Riek Machar and several other armed groups. Meanwhile, South Sudanese civil society has sought to further advance the country’s peace process through coordinated, strategic nonviolent actions and campaigns.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Nonviolent Action

View All