Jumaina Siddiqui is the senior program officer for South Asia at the U.S. Institute of Peace.

She joined USIP after working with the National Democratic Institute (NDI), where she served as the program manager for Pakistan, working on political party development, election observation and reforms, and increasing the participation of women and youth in the political process. Siddiqui was also a U.S.-Pakistan program fellow with the South Asia Center at the Atlantic Council, where her research focused on education reform efforts by political actors in Pakistan and the relationship between donors, civil society, politicians, and the government to move these reforms forward.

Prior to joining NDI, she worked at Global Communities on a U.S. Agency for International Development-funded project to increase stability in the Federally Administered Tribal Areas of Pakistan by providing improved livelihood and economic growth opportunities.

Siddiqui has extensive experience in program design and management as well as policy research and analysis. She has held positions at the American Bar Association’s Rule of Law Initiative focusing on programs in Bangladesh, the Philippines, and Thailand, as well as thematic programs related to media legal defense and access to justice in Asia; at the Stimson Center examining nontraditional security issues in South Asia; and at the Protection Project at Johns Hopkins University, conducting research on international human trafficking and managing a training program on human trafficking in the United States.

Siddiqui holds bachelor’s in political science from American University and master’s from New York University, where her work focused on democracy promotion and the rule of law in the Muslim world, culminating in a thesis on rebuilding justice systems in post-conflict Afghanistan. She also holds a graduate certificate in environmental policy and management from the University of Denver.

Publications By Jumaina

The Latest on Pakistan’s Floods: 3 Things You Need to Know

The Latest on Pakistan’s Floods: 3 Things You Need to Know

Friday, September 9, 2022

By: Jumaina Siddiqui

After experiencing its hottest months in decades this spring, Pakistan has been beset by torrential rains and deadly floods, leaving one-third of the country under water. While no country can be fully prepared for an environmental disaster of this magnitude, corruption and mismanagement have exacerbated the fallout. USIP’s Jumaina Siddiqui explains what makes Pakistan so vulnerable to climate change, how it can better prepare for extreme weather events and what the international community can do to help.

Type: Blog

Environment

Why Pakistan Is Drowning

Why Pakistan Is Drowning

Thursday, September 8, 2022

By: Sahar Khan;  Jumaina Siddiqui

Pakistan is currently experiencing one of the worst environmental disasters in the world. One-third of the country is under water. Over 1,325 people have died and 33 million have been impacted. The latest statistics show that over 1,600 have been injured, 325,000 homes destroyed, 735,000 livestock lost and 2 million acres of crops damaged — numbers which are likely to increase. According to a rough assessment by Atlantic Council’s Uzair Younus and economist Ammar Khan, the direct damage to roads, homes, livestock and crops is over $3 billion, which is an astronomical amount for a developing country like Pakistan.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Environment

Pakistan’s Deadly Floods Come Amid Deluge of Crises

Pakistan’s Deadly Floods Come Amid Deluge of Crises

Thursday, September 1, 2022

By: Tamanna Salikuddin;  Jumaina Siddiqui

After experiencing its hottest months in 61 years in April and May, Pakistan has been hit by a “monsoon season on steroids,” according to U.N. chief Antonio Guterres. Pakistan has long been considered one of the most vulnerable countries to climate change in the world. Despite a history of intense floods, the country was ill-prepared for this year’s monsoon season. Intractable political and economic crises have hampered Pakistan’s capacity to address the ongoing fallout, particularly the worsening humanitarian crisis.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Environment

Pakistan’s New Government Struggles to Consolidate Control

Pakistan’s New Government Struggles to Consolidate Control

Tuesday, August 9, 2022

By: Cyril Almeida;  Colin Cookman;  Adnan Rafiq;  Tamanna Salikuddin;  Jumaina Siddiqui

Pakistan’s current government, an unwieldy multi-party coalition led by Prime Minister Shehbaz Sharif of the Pakistan Muslim League Nawaz (PML-N) party, faced a new setback in July after losses in mid-month special elections for 20 constituencies in the country’s heartland province of Punjab. Although the PML-N coalition attempted to retain control of the provincial government through manuevers in the provincial assembly, a Supreme Court ruling on July 26 overturned earlier precedent and ordered the election of Chaudhry Pervaiz Elahi, an ally of former Prime Minister Imran Khan, to the position of chief minister.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Democracy & GovernanceEconomics

Pakistan’s Climate Challenges Pose a National Security Emergency

Pakistan’s Climate Challenges Pose a National Security Emergency

Thursday, July 7, 2022

By: Jumaina Siddiqui

Pakistan is in the midst of a terrible heatwave, with the temperatures in parts of the country exceeding 120 F. April was the hottest month in the past 61 years, until May came along and saw warmer temperatures. At least 65 people have reportedly died due to the heatwave, but the actual numbers are certainly higher, and it’s caused massive flooding and infrastructure damage in Gilgit-Baltistan, water shortages in Karachi and broader Sindh province, and placed greater demands on the country’s weak electrical grid. Despite monsoon rains beginning in late June — causing at least 77 deaths — many parts of the country still swelter. Pakistan should treat these climate disasters as a full-fledged national security emergency before they stoke conflict that adds further stress amid the country’s other numerous challenges.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Environment

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