Emily Cole is a program officer for governance, justice and security in the Applied Conflict Transformation Center. She works on the Sahel/Maghreb Justice and Security Dialogue project.

Emily has been focused on peacebuilding, governance and humanitarian response in the Sahel for the past several years with experience in both implementation, research and policy. Prior to joining USIP, Emily worked on governance, civil society and peacebuilding programs at FHI 360. Before graduate school, she worked on advocacy and strategy with U.S. private foundations and NGO coalitions.

Emily served in the Peace Corps in Senegal and speaks French and Pulaar. Emily holds a MALD from the Fletcher School at Tufts University and a B.A. from Amherst College.

Publications By Emily

How International Security Support Contributed to Mali’s Coup

How International Security Support Contributed to Mali’s Coup

Monday, September 21, 2020

By: Ena Dion; Emily Cole

Since a 2012 coup, Mali has received significant security assistance from United States, France, the European Union and other foreign donors to address violent extremism and insurgency and help stabilize the country. In the wake of the August military coup, it is clear that strategy has backfired—and that, in fact, the failure of international security sector assistance to prioritize governance likely contributed to the conditions that led to the coup.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Justice, Security & Rule of Law

Five Things to Know About Mali’s Coup

Five Things to Know About Mali’s Coup

Thursday, August 27, 2020

By: Emily Fornof; Emily Cole

On August 18, rising tensions to boiled over into a mutiny, leading to the resignation of President Ibrahim Boubacar Keita. This dramatic chain of events followed three months of protests, calling for Keita’s resignation. As the country grapples with an intractable insurgency and eight years of instability, anger over the government’s failure to resolve conflict, respect democratic norms, and provide basic services pushed citizens and the military to their boiling point. What comes next in Mali over the coming months could have significant implications for the country’s democracy and on the stability of the Sahel.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Justice, Security & Rule of Law; Democracy & Governance; Nonviolent Action

In Niger, Security Requires a Collaborative Strategy

In Niger, Security Requires a Collaborative Strategy

Thursday, September 27, 2018

By: Emily Cole; Ramatou Adamou Gado

Over the summer, police in Niamey, Niger agreed to participate in a live radio call-in show to discuss security concerns, including complaints about police behavior. The police previously had declined to participate in similar activities but had come to see the value of direct communication with the community. In Niger and throughout Africa’s Sahel region, small steps like this toward communication and accountability, and larger changes in policy, are needed to encourage communities to work with security services.

Type: Blog

Justice, Security & Rule of Law; Democracy & Governance

View All