Carla Koppell is the vice president for the Center for Applied Conflict Transformation at the United States Institute of Peace. She previously was chief strategy officer (CSO) for the United States Agency for International Development (USAID). Prior to serving as CSO, Koppell served as USAID’s first senior coordinator for Gender Equality and Women’s Empowerment and as a senior advisor to the USAID Administrator.

Koppell brings to the position twenty-five years of experience working in a wide range of sectors for public, private and non-governmental organizations internationally. Prior to joining USAID, Koppell directed The Institute for Inclusive Security and the Washington, D.C. office of Hunt Alternatives Fund. She also was a senior advisor and, prior to that, interim director of the Conflict Prevention Project at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. Earlier in her career, Koppell served as Deputy Assistant Secretary for International Affairs for the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development. She also worked for the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations.

Koppell authored Preventing the Next Wave of Conflict: Understanding Non-Traditional Threats to Global Security with Anita Sharma. She received her M.A. in public policy from Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and her B.S. from Cornell University.

Publications By Carla

Who Can Inspire the Dalai Lama?

Who Can Inspire the Dalai Lama?

Wednesday, December 6, 2017

By: Carla Koppell

Mahmoud Khalil embodies resilience. In 2011, he was preparing to enter a university in Aleppo, Syria, when war broke out, forcing him to flee to Lebanon. Instead of starting school, he became a refugee day laborer. Five years later, at 22, he is completing university studies while helping to educate more than...

Youth; Gender

Want Women at Peace Talks? Mandate It

Want Women at Peace Talks? Mandate It

Tuesday, October 31, 2017

By: Carla Koppell

The evidence on ending violent conflict is clear: when women participate in negotiations it helps achieve peace. A study of 182 signed peace accords over two decades showed these accords were 35 percent more likely to last at least 15 years when women were involved. Yet 17 years after the United Nations first called for including women in all peace talks globally, women remain sidelined. The lack of structural incentives for change is the key—until we get the incentives right, exclusion will rule.

Gender; Mediation, Negotiation & Dialogue; Peace Processes

Curbing the Next Wave of Radicals

Curbing the Next Wave of Radicals

Tuesday, June 6, 2017

By: Carla Koppell

A seaside suburb of Dakar, Senegal’s capital, Guédiawaye boasts a new coastal highway, large stadiums for wrestling and soccer, and new urban parks that even have marshes to manage periodic flooding. By all appearances, it is a growing, productive community. Yet underneath, the city struggles with high crime rates, environmental degradation, extreme poverty, unemployment and a disturbing growth in the number of suspected extremists.

Violent Extremism; Mediation, Negotiation & Dialogue; Democracy & Governance

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