Camilla Pohle-Anderson is a senior program specialist at USIP, where her work focuses on peace and stability in the Pacific Islands. 

Before joining USIP, she worked for the U.S. government as a political analyst covering the Pacific Islands, including their politics, security and foreign policy. 

Pohle-Anderson holds a bachelor's degree in history from Mount Holyoke College.

Publications By Camilla

Why is Biden Hosting the First U.S-Pacific Islands Summit Now?

Why is Biden Hosting the First U.S-Pacific Islands Summit Now?

Monday, September 26, 2022

By: Brian Harding;  Camilla Pohle-Anderson

President Joe Biden will host leaders of Pacific Island countries for a summit at the White House from September 28-29, the latest U.S. effort to strengthen ties with a region that is increasingly the focus of competition between China and the United States and its partners. While China is a major force behind the United States’ effort to reengage with the Pacific Islands, strategic competition has also reawakened Washington to its fundamental interests in the region, which have existed for many decades, and long predate the current era of U.S.-China rivalry.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Global Policy

Solomon Islands: Election Delay Would Threaten Peace and Democracy

Solomon Islands: Election Delay Would Threaten Peace and Democracy

Wednesday, September 7, 2022

By: Brian Harding;  Camilla Pohle-Anderson

Solomon Islands Prime Minister Manasseh Sogavare is attempting to delay the 2023 elections — which would normally take place between May and August — to 2024, causing concerns among civil society and regional partners regarding the country’s growing autocracy and ties to China. Delaying the vote is broadly unpopular and could spark protests. Some Solomon Islanders fear that Sogavare may use Chinese security forces to crack down on protesters, which would fuel further instability. Postponing the election may also set a dangerous precedent for the future, allowing Sogavare to further solidify his power.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Democracy & GovernanceGlobal Policy

The Next Five Years Are Crucial for Bougainville’s Independence Bid

The Next Five Years Are Crucial for Bougainville’s Independence Bid

Friday, August 12, 2022

By: Brian Harding;  Camilla Pohle-Anderson

Now that Papua New Guinea Prime Minister James Marape has been reelected, the stage is set for him to settle what he has called the biggest issue facing the country — the future political status of Bougainville, an autonomous region seeking independence by 2027. Papua New Guinea is unlikely to let it secede, but Bougainville is unlikely to settle for anything less than full independence, and positive relations between the two governments will be of paramount importance in the coming years. Meanwhile, intensifying U.S.-China competition in the South Pacific creates wider implications for Bougainville’s potential independence.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Global PolicyPeace Processes

Solomon Islands: WWII Legacy Unresolved 80 Years After Guadalcanal Campaign

Solomon Islands: WWII Legacy Unresolved 80 Years After Guadalcanal Campaign

Thursday, August 4, 2022

By: Brian Harding;  Camilla Pohle-Anderson

On August 7, the Solomon Islands will commemorate the 80th anniversary of the Guadalcanal campaign during a visit from U.S. Deputy Secretary of State Wendy Sherman and U.S. Ambassador to Australia Caroline Kennedy, whose fathers both fought there in World War II. As the United States and its partners look to strengthen their relationships with the Solomon Islands, addressing the enduring legacies of WWII — particularly the issue of unexploded ordnance — should be a renewed focus.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Global PolicyPeace Processes

China’s Search for a Permanent Military Presence in the Pacific Islands

China’s Search for a Permanent Military Presence in the Pacific Islands

Thursday, July 21, 2022

By: Brian Harding;  Camilla Pohle-Anderson

In April, China signed an unprecedented security pact with the Solomon Islands, sparking regional concerns of a future Chinese military presence there. China’s pursuit of greater military reach in the Pacific Islands draws parallels to Imperial Japan’s construction of bases prior to World War II, and the implications are, likewise, strikingly similar. A Chinese military presence in the Pacific Islands could complicate transit between Australia and the United States, allow Beijing to increase its power projection in the second and third island chains, and bring Chinese military firepower closer than ever to Australian and U.S. territory. Can the United States and its partners prevent such an outcome?

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Global Policy

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