Amanda Long is a program and policy analyst at the U.S. Institute of Peace. In this role, she supports strategic communications and planning for the Executive Office by researching, conceptualizing, and executing key initiatives that help to advance the Institute's strategic priorities.

Prior to joining the Institute, she was an intern at the Atlantic Council’s Future Europe Initiative and at the Council on Foreign Relations. Long has also interned in the Texas State Senate and with the International Visitor Leadership Program at the World Affairs Council of Dallas/Fort Worth.

Long graduated from The University of Texas at Austin with a bachelor’s degree in international relations and global studies.

Publications By Amanda

Regional Security Support: A Vital First Step for Peace in Mozambique

Regional Security Support: A Vital First Step for Peace in Mozambique

Thursday, June 23, 2022

By: Andrew Cheatham;  Amanda Long;  Thomas P. Sheehy

Over the last year, Mozambique has seen a marked improvement in security conditions in its troubled Cabo Delgado region. The military intervention of Southern African Development Community (SADC) member states and Rwanda has disrupted an Islamist insurgency that emerged in 2017 and has since inflicted an enormous toll on the region. Security in key areas of Cabo Delgado and neighboring provinces has stabilized, giving the Mozambican government — and its international backers — an opportunity to foster reconciliation leading to an enduring peace. The Mozambican government should immediately take advantage of this exceptional regional commitment, which won’t last forever.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Justice, Security & Rule of Law

A New U.S. Approach to Help Fragile States Amid COVID-Driven Economic Crisis

A New U.S. Approach to Help Fragile States Amid COVID-Driven Economic Crisis

Friday, March 5, 2021

By: Tyler Beckelman;  Amanda Long

The global economy is projected to rebound from the effects of COVID-19 in 2021, but the world’s most fragile states may not share in the upswing. Saddled with economic collapse and soaring debt, developing economies are likely to be left further behind after shrinking about 5 percent last year, according to World Bank estimates. As a result, over 55 million people could be plunged deeper into poverty, fueling social and political grievances and increasing the risks of instability.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Fragility & ResilienceGlobal Health

How the Biden Administration Can Revive U.N. Peacekeeping

How the Biden Administration Can Revive U.N. Peacekeeping

Thursday, February 18, 2021

By: Amanda Long;  Colin Thomas-Jensen

When American politicians want to temper voter’s concerns over U.S. military commitments overseas, many employ perhaps the most worn-out foreign policy cliché: “The United States cannot police the world.” After all, the United States has neither the capacity nor a compelling national interest in putting boots on the ground to resolve every global crisis. But, this begs the question: Who will step forward when boots on the ground are needed?

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Global PolicyPeace Processes

Four Lessons for Cease-fires in the Age of COVID

Four Lessons for Cease-fires in the Age of COVID

Thursday, October 1, 2020

By: Tyler Beckelman;  Amanda Long

During his opening remarks at the 75th U.N. General Assembly, Secretary-General António Guterres renewed his appeal for a global humanitarian cease-fire, urging the international community to achieve one in the next 100 days. But in the roughly 180 days since his initial appeal, most conflict parties have not heeded the secretary-general’s plea. What can peacebuilders do to advance the secretary-general’s call? Four key lessons have emerged over the last six months on how cease-fires can be achieved—or stalled—by COVID-19.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Global PolicyPeace ProcessesMediation, Negotiation & Dialogue

America can build peace better—if it includes women.

America can build peace better—if it includes women.

Wednesday, August 19, 2020

By: Amanda Long;  Kathleen Kuehnast, Ph.D.

The United States is making a publicly little-noted stride this month to strengthen its response to the violent crises worldwide that have uprooted 80 million people, the most ever recorded. Officials are overhauling America’s method for supporting the “fragile” states whose poor governance breeds most of the world’s violent conflict. Yet the proven new approach—helping these countries meet their people’s needs and thus prevent violence and extremism—will fall short if its implementation fails to include and support women in every step of that effort. Fortunately, an earlier reform to U.S. policy offers practical lessons for doing so.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Fragility & ResilienceGender

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