China’s impact on global development is growing through its investments, foreign aid contributions, and financing platforms such as the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank. On December 7, specialists on China’s economic development and fragile states examined what the “China model” really is and whether China’s experiences can provide lessons on development for other countries, and discussed how Chinese investments and assistance might help mitigate or complicate local conditions in countries experiencing violent conflict. 

China’s leaders have argued that economic development is key to mitigating and resolving internal strife and conflicts worldwide. In 2015, Chinese President Xi Jinping said, “We must hold on to development as our master key, for only through development can we resolve the root cause of conflicts, safeguard the fundamental rights of the people, and meet the ardent hope of our people for a better future.” In a recent speech to the 19th Chinese Communist Party Congress, President Xi praised China’s development success and stated it “offers a new option for other countries and nations who want to speed up their development while preserving their independence.” Is China shaping the global discussions and actions on peace and development?

Continue the conversation on Twitter with #ChinaModel.

Speakers

Jennifer Staatsmoderator
Director, China Program, Asia Center, U.S. Institute of Peace 

Yuen Yuen Ang
Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Michigan

Jonathan Papoulidis
Executive Advisor on Fragile States, World Vision USA
Visiting Scholar, Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, Stanford University

Matt Ferchen
Nonresident Scholar, Carnegie-Tsinghua Center for Global Policy

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