Tunisia: Democratic but Precarious

Tunisia: Democratic but Precarious

Friday, December 22, 2017

By: James Rupert

Amid central Tunisia’s dry farmlands, the city of Sidi Bouzid bustled one recent day under warm autumn sunshine. Street vendors and shoppers jostled under the roof of a new, open-air market, selling and buying produce or cheap clothes. Seven years after an impoverished street vendor in this city immolated himself and ignited the Arab Spring revolutions, his homeland has achieved a precarious stability. By many measures the Arab world’s only democracy, Tunisia remains hobbled by corruption, unemployment and violent extremism.

Democracy & Governance; Violent Extremism

Tunisia and Ukraine: Linchpins of U.S. interests

Tunisia and Ukraine: Linchpins of U.S. interests

Friday, February 5, 2016

By: Kristin M. Lord; William B. Taylor

The Obama administration’s announcement this week that it plans to quadruple military resources devoted to deterring Russia in Europe highlights how seriously U.S. and NATO leaders view the threat posed by Russia. Ukraine is struggling to save its young democracy and stave off public disaffection with the new government’s valiant but halting reforms, even as Russia continues its campaign of military and economic goading. 

Conflict Analysis & Prevention; Global Policy; Democracy & Governance

Action, Not Words, Needed to Improve Ukraine's Investment Climate

Action, Not Words, Needed to Improve Ukraine's Investment Climate

Friday, November 20, 2015

By: Colin Cleary; William B. Taylor

Ukraine must not remain a country of great but unrealized potential. The International Monetary Fund package and other foreign assistance are helping stabilize Ukraine’s economy, but only an attractive business climate can result in the level of investment that will truly transform the country for the long term.

Conflict Analysis & Prevention; Economics & Environment; Global Policy

2015: War and Tide of Refugees Multiplies Urgency of USIP's Work

2015: War and Tide of Refugees Multiplies Urgency of USIP's Work

Wednesday, December 23, 2015

By: USIP Staff

As the world this year saw its highest tide ever of people displaced by war, violence or persecution, the U.S. Institute of Peace has reinforced its work in the field to help reduce violence and its threat to U.S. and global security. “Our mission has never been more urgent,” says USIP President Nancy Lindborg in a video that highlights USIP’s work worldwide.

Fragility and Resilience; Conflict Analysis & Prevention; Reconciliation; Youth

Ukraine's 'Invisible Crisis': 1.5 Million Who Fled War With Russia

Ukraine's 'Invisible Crisis': 1.5 Million Who Fled War With Russia

Monday, November 23, 2015

By: Viola Gienger

When 5,000 people flooded into a city of 500,000 in one night with little more than the pajamas on their backs, they were greeted by the mayor and an assemblage of churches and civic groups ready to embrace them with shelter, food, clothing and moral support. The scene might sound like something from Europe’s west, where refugees are flooding in from the Middle East and Africa. But this is Ukraine in the midst of a war and an economic crisis, and two years into upheaval, the strain is beginning to show.

Economics & Environment; Human Rights; Fragility and Resilience

Diplomats, Aid Workers Must Take Risks to Reduce Conflict, New U.S. Blueprint Says

Diplomats, Aid Workers Must Take Risks to Reduce Conflict, New U.S. Blueprint Says

Tuesday, May 5, 2015

By: Sara Egozi

America’s new diplomatic and foreign-aid blueprint places top priority on the need to prevent and resolve violent conflict and strengthen governance in an effort to restore a measure of global stability. But to accomplish those objectives, the plan’s authors also stressed that U.S. government agencies, together with Congress, must directly accept and address the inherent risks to the civilian workers who carry out those missions.   

Conflict Analysis & Prevention; Violent Extremism; Global Policy

Q&A: Tunisia’s Upcoming Elections

Q&A: Tunisia’s Upcoming Elections

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

By: William B. Taylor

Tunisia’s prospects for retaining its title as the only transition of the Arab Spring that hasn’t failed or collapsed into violence faces further tests this month and next, with important parliamentary elections scheduled for Oct. 26 and a presidential election on Nov. 23. USIP Acting President William B. Taylor, a former special coordinator for Middle East transitions in the State Department, considers what’s at stake.