This initiative, which brings together leading figures from Iraq and its six neighbors, and produced the March 2007 Marmara Declaration, is the only initiative of its kind.

Iraq's neighbors are playing a major role—both positive and negative—in the stabilization and reconstruction of "the new Iraq."

In an effort to prevent conflict across Iraq's borders and in order to promote positive international and regional engagement, USIP has initiated high-level, non-official dialogue between foreign policy and national security figures from Iraq and the neighboring states. The Marmara Declaration, a blueprint for a regional peace process for Iraq, was the product of the Institute's most recent dialogue in Turkey.

Moreover, as part of the overall "Iraq and Its Neighbors" project, a group of leading specialists on the geopolitics of the region and on the domestic politics of the individual countries is assessing the interests and influence of the countries surrounding Iraq. In addition, these specialists are examining how the situation in Iraq and across its borders impacts U.S. bilateral relations with the neighbors.

The project has produced a series of in-depth research reports, as well as ongoing public forums and media commentary. The studies are available free-of-charge, and can be accessed below.

The "Iraq and Its Neighbors" project was directed by Scott Lasensky of USIP's Center for Conflict Analysis and Prevention.

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