USIP staff members are privileged to be able to travel and work in many places that are not on the beaten track. For the first time, USIP shares photos from the field in an organized online exhibition.

USIP staff members are privileged to be able to travel and work in many places that are not on the beaten track. Along the way, we see amazing things, learn and share the experiences of different cultures and form lasting friendships. For the first time, understanding the power of images and hoping to inspire as well as inform, USIP shares photos from the field in an organized online exhibition.

The images below were all taken by USIP staff while working in Sudan. They have been divided into three categories to provide glimpses of three different ways in which we encountered the people and culture of the country.

 

USIP at Work

This gallery showcases USIP's work in Sudan. USIP frequently holds workshops and engages tribal leaders and civil society members in effective dialogue.

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Life in Sudan

 Life in Sudan

This gallery illustrates the variety of life in different parts of Sudan, from big cities to small villages and deserts to rivers.

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People and Landscape

 People and Landscapes

This gallery presents striking portraits of the Sudanese landscape and people, showing beauty and diversity that is rarely advertised.

View Gallery

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