Electing Peace: Violence Prevention and Impact at the Polls examines election violence prevention and assesses the effectiveness of different prevention practices—which are effective, which are not, and under what circumstances.

Targeted peacebuilding efforts are frequently used to prevent election violence. Practitioners possess a variety of programming options, including peace messaging campaigns, preventive diplomacy and monitoring missions. But the ability of election violence prevention to achieve its intended outcome merits further investigation. This edited volume focuses on five electoral democracies: Honduras, Bangladesh, Thailand, Malawi and Moldova. During their most recent election cycle, all five countries displayed similar risk levels but experienced differing levels of electoral violence. Through these case studies and comparative analysis, the authors assess the impact of prevention efforts on the levels of violence and derive lessons-learned that can be applied in other electoral contexts. 

Electing Peace is a rigorous and engaging piece of research on an understudied topic. The volume is set to become a seminal work in the emerging field of electoral violence studies.”
—Sarah Birch, Professor of Comparative Politics, School of Social and Political Sciences, University of Glasgow

Jonas Claes is a senior program officer in the Center for Applied Conflict Transformation at the U.S. Institute of Peace (USIP), where he conducts research and analysis on the prevention of electoral violence and mass atrocities. In this capacity, Claes coordinates USIP prevention projects and consults with senior U.S. and UN officials in fine-tuning prevention practices. 

Contributors:

  • Geoffrey Macdonald
  • Duncan McCargo
  • Petra Desatova
  • Manuela Travaglianti
  • Dominik Tolksdorf
  • Elizabeth Murray

Related Publications

South Sudan’s Pitfalls of Power Sharing

South Sudan’s Pitfalls of Power Sharing

Friday, February 16, 2018

By: USIP Staff; Susan Stigant; Aly Verjee

This week, a new proposal for a power sharing government was tabled at the ongoing Intergovernmental Authority on Development (IGAD) High Level Revitalization Forum (HLRF) peace talks for South Sudan. An earlier, 2015 peace deal also contained a formula for power sharing; that arrangement failed and the civil war re-ignited a year later. Power sharing arrangements are appropriate if certain conditions are met, but not enough has been done to ensure the latest proposal will overcome the obstacles present in South Sudan, according to Susan Stigant, USIP’s director for Africa programs and Aly Verjee, a visiting expert at USIP and a former senior advisor to the IGAD mediation, who comment on the proposal and suggest how it could be improved.

Democracy & Governance; Fragility and Resilience; Global Policy

To Stabilize Iraq After ISIS, Help Iraqis Reconcile

To Stabilize Iraq After ISIS, Help Iraqis Reconcile

Sunday, February 11, 2018

By: USIP Staff; Nancy Lindborg; Sarhang Hamasaeed

An international conference opens in Kuwait Monday to plan ways to rebuild Iraq and secure it against renewed extremist violence following the three-year war against ISIS. A USIP team just spent nine days in Iraq for talks with government and civil society leaders, part of the Institute’s years-long effort to help the country stabilize. The Kuwait conference will gather government, business and civil society leaders to consider a reconstruction that Iraq has said could cost $100 billion. USIP’s president, Nancy Lindborg, and Middle East program director, Sarhang Hamasaeed, say any realistic rebuilding plan must focus also on the divisions and grievances in Iraq that led to ISIS’ violence and that still exist.

Conflict Analysis & Prevention; Violent Extremism

View All Publications