As United States troops withdraw from Iraq in December of 2011, USIP looks back at its actions on the ground in Iraq and ahead at its programs for 2012 and beyond.

Photo courtesy of NY Times

U.S. Institute of Peace staff have been at work on the ground in Iraq since 2003 with the mission of strengthening local capacities to prevent, manage and resolve conflicts peacefully. We work across the community, provincial and national levels, and above all seek to provide Iraqis with the tools to take active roles as citizens and peacebuilders.

The Institute’s portfolio spans a diverse range of activities and partners, including the U.S. government in Baghdad and Washington, local universities, the Iraqi parliament, Iraqi ministries, provincial governments, women leaders, youth groups, internally displaced persons, media organizations, and civil society.

USIP interventions have helped bring about local reconciliation in Baghdad, provided Iraq’s next generation a stake in peacebuilding, promoted women’s leadership, improved educational curricula, contributed to the realization of rights under Iraq’s new constitution, and furthered U.S. policy development on Iraq.

As United States troops withdraw from Iraq in December of 2011, USIP looks back at its actions on the ground in Iraq and ahead at its programs for 2012 and beyond. Organized by year, projects are listed by the year in which they began, although most projects are multi-year endeavors. The timeline is meant to be representative of USIP’s work in Iraq and is not exhaustive.

Timeline of major USIP activities and contributions in Iraq

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