The U.S. Institute of Peace (USIP) launched its Sudanese & South Sudanese Youth Leaders program in 2013. The program brings Sudanese and South Sudanese peacebuilders between ages 18 and 35 to Washington, DC to be in residence at the U.S. Institute of Peace (USIP) for four months. The goal of the project is to support youth to gain the knowledge, skills, and confidence to further their peacebuilding work and position themselves as stronger peacebuilding agents in their communities. USIP will bring one Sudanese and one South Sudanese leader in the spring of 2016 and another two leaders in the fall of 2016.

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Previous youth leaders have done projects related to religious peacebuilding, the role of women in conflict and peace, and the role of media in peacebuilding, analyses of the roots of local conflict. Youth leaders spend the majority of their fellowships doing individual research, attending meetings with USIP staff, and participating in events in the D.C. area.

Current Youth Leaders

Nyachangkuoth Ramban Tai

Nyachangkuoth R. Tai is a 2018 Youth Leader in the Sudan and South Sudan Youth Leaders program at the U.S. Institute of Peace (USIP). During her time at the Institute, she will work with program lead to develop a strategy for engaging young female peacebuilders in USIP's work in South Sudan. She has been a champion and one of the leading voices of gender equality and freedom of speech in South Sudan. She holds a bachelor's Degree in Economics and social studies, specializing in Rural Development from University of Bahr el-Ghazal, South Sudan. She fluently speaks Nuer, Arabic and English.

Namisio Bage

Namisio Joy Bage is a 2018 Youth Leader in the Sudan and South Sudan Youth Leaders program at the U. S. Institute of Peace (USIP). During her time at the Institute, she will work with program lead to develop a strategy for engaging young female peacebuilders in USIP's future work in South Sudan. Joy is the co-founder of Let's Girl Talk Initiative, which empowers young female to speak up against early marriages. She is passionate and furious advocate of human rights, peace building, and sexual reproductive health issues. She is currently pursuing a Bachelor of Human Rights, Peace and humanitarian intervention at Uganda Christian university. She fluently speaks English, Luganda and pazande.

For future iterations of the Sudanese and South Sudanese Youth Leaders Program, please find instructions below.

Please read the application instructions before starting your application. USIP will consider both internet-based and Word-based application submissions, but prefers internet-based applications when possible. The internet-based version of the application can be found here and the Word version of the application can be accessed here. Please only submit one application.

For program and eligibility requirements, please refer to the application instructions.

    Application and Program Timeline

    • January 15, 2018 - Application opens
    • February19, 2018 - Application deadline; no submissions will be accepted after 12:00 noon EST
    • March 15, 2018 - Semi-finalists notified via email by 17:00 (5:00pm) EST
    • March 19 - 25, 2018 - Semi-finalists interviewed by phone
    • March 30, 2018 - Finalists notified
    • June18, 2018 - Spring cohort of youth leaders arrive in Washington, D.C.
    • August 8, 2018 - Spring cohort of youth leaders return home

    Past Youth Leaders

    Francis Banychieng Jor
    Project: Promotion of Gender Equality and Inclusiveness

    Ajing Chol Giir, South Sudan
    Project: The role of “Sports and Cultural Dialogue” in peacebuilding and reconciliation

    Silvio William Deng, South Sudan
    Project: Root Causes of Ethnic Conflict in Upper Nile State

    Ikhlas Mohammed, Sudan
    Project: Women’s Role in Conflict Resolution in Darfur

    Arif Omer, Sudan 
    Project: The Peace Lens Project (Media and Conflict in Sudan)

    Othow Okoti Onger, South Sudan 
    Project: The Role of the Church in Peacebuilding in Jonglei State

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