“We need a new national security strategy to prevent the spread of extremism,” Chairs of 9/11 Commission Warn in New Report

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Refugees need to feel safe enough to return: UN - Daily Star

Sunday, January 21, 2018

News Type: USIP in the News

The United Nations has reiterated its call for voluntary repatriation of Rohingyas from Bangladesh saying Rohingyas need to feel that the situation is safe enough for them. “It is up for people to choose to go home. No one should choose for them. Any repatriation of Rohingyas back to Myanmar needs to be voluntary,” said Spokesman for the UN Secretary-General Stephane Dujarric in regular briefing at the UN headquarters.

Will the pope’s Myanmar visit bring any relief to persecuted Rohingya? - PBS NewsHour

Tuesday, November 28, 2017

News Type: USIP in the News

Without mentioning the Rohingya by name, Pope Francis spoke out in Myanmar of the need to respect all ethnic groups. It was unclear whether the pope pressed leader Aung San Suu Kyi, who has downplayed the severity of the attacks in the past, on the issue of persecution. William Brangham talks to Priscilla Clapp, former...

Amanpour - CNN

Tuesday, November 28, 2017

News Type: USIP in the News

Was he wrong for not specifically mentioning the Rohingya? What should Aung San Suu Kyi be doing to right the crisis? Amanpour speaks with a former ambassador and Amnesty's Crisis Response

By-elections are underway in Myanmar - CNBC

Thursday, March 30, 2017

News Type: USIP in the News

Priscilla Clapp, U.S. Institute of Peace, says NLD leader Aung San Suu Kyii has made progress by bringing civilians into the peace process.

World Turns Blind Eye to Yemen’s Civil War, Rohingya Refugees and South Sudan’s Famine - The Washington Diplomat

Thursday, March 30, 2017

News Type: USIP in the News

But Priscilla Clapp, who was U.S. chief of mission in Myanmar from 1999 to 2002 and is now a senior advisor at the U.S. Institute of Peace, said she objects to extreme words like genocide, holocaust, ethnic cleansing and crimes against humanity, “because that is not what this is. This is not Yugoslavia.” Many groups on both sides of the conflict are working “very quietly” in Myanmar to resolve it, Clapp recently told a reporter for Claremont McKenna College’s website.

Episode 118 - Global Dispatches

Friday, July 15, 2016

News Type: USIP in the News

Clapp is the co-author with Mort Halperin of what I consider one of the most important books you can read about US foreign policy. It’s called Bureaucratic Politics and Foreign Policy, and as the title suggests, the book describes the role of the bureaucracy in shaping US foreign policy. We kick off with an extended conversation about that book, and then have another extended conversation about how Clapp, as the State Department official in charge of refugee programs in the late 1980s, used t...

Trump Campaign Manager’s Firm Turned Blind Eye to Burma Rapes - The Daily Beast

Monday, June 20, 2016

News Type: USIP in the News

“Some military units clearly viewed rape as a legitimate means of demoralizing and degrading their enemies,” Clapp said. “Yes, that was used. It still is, unfortunately.” “In reality, the military government was using violence against everybody, not just women,” she continued. “The army was an equal-opportunity violence machine, aimed at men, women, and children.”