William B. Taylor is vice president, Strategic Stability and Security at the U.S. Institute of Peace. Last year, he served as chargé d’affaires at the U.S. embassy in Kyiv. During the Arab Spring, he oversaw U.S. assistance and support to Egypt, Tunisia, Libya and Syria. He served as the U.S. ambassador to Ukraine from 2006 to 2009.

He also served as the U.S. government's representative to the Mideast Quartet, which facilitated the Israeli disengagement from Gaza and parts of the West Bank. He served in Baghdad as the first director of the Iraq Reconstruction Management Office from 2004 to 2005, and in Kabul as coordinator of international and U.S. assistance to Afghanistan from 2002 to 2003. Ambassador Taylor was also coordinator of U.S. assistance to the former Soviet Union and Eastern Europe. He earlier served on the staff of Senator Bill Bradley.

He is a graduate of West Point and Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government and served as an infantry platoon leader and combat company commander in the U.S. Army in Vietnam and Germany.

He is married with two adult children.

Publications By William

Ukraine just held a political earthquake. Here’s how to respond.

Ukraine just held a political earthquake. Here’s how to respond.

Thursday, April 25, 2019

By: William B. Taylor

In electing a political newcomer as president, Ukrainians have conducted their third revolution in 27 years of independence from Russian rule. Millions filled public squares to demand democratic accountability in the 2004 Orange Revolution and the 2013-14 Euromaidan. But last Sunday, Ukrainians overhauled their government through the ballot box—a consolidation of their maturing democracy. They elected television actor Volodymyr Zelenskiy with 73 percent of the vote, a protest against persistent economic and political corruption and disappointment with lack of progress ending the war in the east of the country. Like any sharp political turn, it raises uncertainties—but the international community should reinforce Ukrainian voters’ demand for truly effective anti-corruption reforms, and for continued –even expanded – pressure to counter Russia’s assaults on Ukraine’s independence.

Type: Blog

Democracy & Governance; Electoral Violence

Amb. Bill Taylor on Ukraine’s Presidential Elections

Amb. Bill Taylor on Ukraine’s Presidential Elections

Wednesday, April 24, 2019

By: William B. Taylor

Following his election observation, Taylor discusses Volodymyr Zelenskiy’s victory and how he can build support at home and abroad. “The president-elect is already getting a lot of support from the international community,” and if he implements the pro-Western policies he advocated during the campaign the U.S. will continue to strengthen bilateral ties, says Taylor.

Type: Podcast

Democracy & Governance; Electoral Violence

Ukraine’s Presidential Vote: Free but Not Yet Fair

Ukraine’s Presidential Vote: Free but Not Yet Fair

Friday, April 5, 2019

By: William B. Taylor

Following Ukraine’s first round of presidential voting on Sunday, the country faces a tough, maybe nasty, two-week campaign for the runoff. This second election since the 2014 pro-democracy movement that Ukrainians call their “Revolution of Dignity” reflects significant consolidation of Ukraine’s democracy in the intervening five years. That is no small achievement, given Russia’s continuing interference—especially the war in Ukraine’s Donbas region, which has killed more than 13,000 people in those five years.

Type: Blog

Democracy & Governance; Electoral Violence

 Amb. Bill Taylor on Russia’s Annexation of Crimea

Amb. Bill Taylor on Russia’s Annexation of Crimea

Thursday, March 21, 2019

By: William B. Taylor

On the five-year anniversary of Russia’s annexation of Crimea, Amb. Taylor—a former U.S. ambassador to Ukraine—explains why it has been so difficult for Ukraine and its allies to oust Russia from the Ukrainian territory. “Sadly … the people of Crimea are worse off than they were five years ago,” while the West continues to struggle with how to respond to Moscow’s territorial grab.

Type: Podcast

Conflict Analysis & Prevention

View All