Civilian casualties have dramatically increased in Afghanistan, with the number of civilian deaths doubling in 2007. The inadvertent killing of Afghans by U.S. and NATO forces is undermining efforts by the international community to stabilize Afghanistan, and has resulted in a decline in approval and support for international military forces in Afghanistan. Can NATO successfully defeat Taliban insurgents while simultaneously upholding thier mandate to protect Afghans and promote stability?

 

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First Lady Rula Ghani on Afghan Women’s Consensus

First Lady Rula Ghani on Afghan Women’s Consensus

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By: USIP Staff

As Afghans, the United States and the international community seek an end to the war in Afghanistan, the country’s first lady, Rula Ghani, says thousands of Afghan women nationwide have expressed a clear consensus on two points. They insist that the war needs to end, and that the peace to follow must continue to build opportunities for women. The single greatest step to advance Afghan women’s cause is education and training to build their professional capacities, Ghani told an audience at USIP.

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Scott Smith on What’s Next in the Afghan Peace Process

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What Has the U.S. Got Against Peace Talks?

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