COVID-19 has overwhelmed some of the world’s most robust healthcare systems and imperiled its richest economies. For countries experiencing fragility, conflict, and violence (FCV), COVID-19 adds even greater stress, threatening to reverse decades of advancements in poverty reduction and development. In these settings, the fallout from the pandemic may strain the social fabric in ways that deepen fragility and exacerbate protracted crises—with potentially devastating impacts on the health and livelihoods of the world’s most vulnerable populations.

You will be able to participate in the live Q&A using the YouTube chat box function on the YouTube page.


Join USIP and the World Bank Group as we examine international efforts to respond to the first- and second-order impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic in fragile states. Panelists will draw lessons from other recent outbreaks to consider what works in tackling pandemics on the ground in FCV settings, as well as how actors can work together to ensure responses to the COVID-19 crisis do not exacerbate existing drivers of fragility. Additionally, the panel will examine how to manage long-term social and economic consequences, including how the COVID-19 response can help lay the foundation for strengthened governance and more effective institutions.

You can join the conversation on Twitter by using #COVIDandConflict and #PeoplePeaceProsperity

Speakers

Axel van Trotsenburg
Managing Director of Operations, World Bank 

Nancy Lindborg 
President & CEO, United States Institute of Peace

Sir Mark Lowcock
Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator, United Nations

H.E. Samuel D. Tweah, Jr.
Minister of Finance and Development Planning, Republic of Liberia

Ms. Lamis Al-Iryani
Head, Monitoring and Evaluation, Yemen Social Fund for Development

Raj Kumar, moderator
President and Editor-in-Chief, Devex

Latest Publications

Beijing Legislation Reignites Hong Kong Protests

Beijing Legislation Reignites Hong Kong Protests

Thursday, May 28, 2020

By: Patricia M. Kim; Rachel Vandenbrink

In Hong Kong, protesters have once again taken to the streets to push back against China’s efforts to assert further control over the territory. After a year of intense demonstrations calling for greater autonomy from the mainland, Hong Kong is now facing proposed legislation from Beijing that would broadly curtail citizens’ rights and freedoms. USIP’s Patricia Kim and Rachel Vandenbrink examine the proposed legislation, how the coronavirus pandemic is affecting the situation, and what the U.S. can do in response.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Democracy & Governance

Illicit Drug Trafficking and Use in Libya: Highs and Lows

Illicit Drug Trafficking and Use in Libya: Highs and Lows

Thursday, May 28, 2020

By: Fiona Mangan

This report explores how illicit drug trafficking and drug use in Libya has shaped and been shaped by the country’s ongoing conflict. Drawing on hundreds of interviews and dedicated research, it examines Libya’s pre-2011 illicit economy, delves into the social impact of drugs, and focuses on drug use on the frontlines of Libya’s ongoing conflict, the corrosive impact of drug trafficking and use on the justice and security sector, and how trafficking and organized crime undercut peacebuilding and state consolidation.

Type: Peaceworks

Justice, Security & Rule of Law

Coronavirus and ISIS: The Challenge of Repatriation from Al-Hol

Coronavirus and ISIS: The Challenge of Repatriation from Al-Hol

Thursday, May 28, 2020

By: Julia C. Hurley

It was just over a year ago, in March of 2019, that the United States and coalition forces declared the territorial defeat of ISIS following the fall of its last stronghold in Baghouz, Syria. Male fighters over 15 were placed in Kurdish run detention centers throughout northeast Syria, while tens of thousands of women and children who were living among the terrorist organization streamed into the al-Hol camp, giving rise to an unprecedented mix of humanitarian and security challenges. If left unaddressed, the camp could easily serve as the breeding ground for the next generation of ISIS, which is already beginning to reemerge in parts of Syria and Iraq.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Global Health; Violent Extremism

Is the Afghan Peace Process Back on Track?

Is the Afghan Peace Process Back on Track?

Thursday, May 28, 2020

By: Scott Smith

A three-day cease-fire between the Taliban and Afghan government over Eid al-Fitr expired on Tuesday. This was only the second such cessation of hostilities in the nearly two-decade war. And just two weeks ago, President Ashraf Ghani and his rival, Abdullah Abdullah, agreed to share power after a monthslong dispute over the 2019 presidential election. These developments have injected renewed hope that a political solution, negotiated among Afghans, is still possible. USIP’s Scott Smith looks it all means for the peace process, when we can expect the vital intra-Afghan negotiations to begin, and what, if any, impact COVID-19 has had on peace.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Peace Processes

Jacob Stokes on China’s Hong Kong Policy

Jacob Stokes on China’s Hong Kong Policy

Wednesday, May 27, 2020

By: Jacob Stokes

After Beijing passed a new law curtailing freedom in Hong Kong, protests have again erupted in the territory. USIP’s Jacob Stokes says Hong Kong’s democracy poses a threat to Beijing’s legitimacy, and that if China “can’t produce enough economic growth … then that threat … becomes much more acute.”

Type: Podcast

Democracy & Governance

View All Publications