From 1986 to today, USIP’s Jennings Randolph Senior Fellowship program has supported research, writing and in-house advising on a wide variety of topics related to peace and violent conflict. The program's more than 320 past fellows have studied everything from the influence of Track Two Diplomacy on U.S.-Russia relations to the effects of oil and other natural resources on prospects for peace.

Current Senior Fellows include:


Veronique Dudouet

Véronique Dudouet is Program Director for Conflict Transformation Research at the Berghof Foundation. She joined the Berghof research team in 2005 and has since managed various collaborative research projects on resistance/liberation movements, negotiations and third-party intervention in asymmetric conflicts, inclusive political/security transitions, post-war governance and civil resistance.

She conducts regular policy advice, peer-to-peer advice and training seminars for/with conflict and peacebuilding stakeholders. She also carries out consultancy research for various civil society organizations and international agencies (e.g. UNDP, OECD-DAC, European Parliament/External Action Service, GIZ, NOREF) and serves as Academic Advisor of the International Center on Nonviolent Conflict in Washington, D.C.

Her dissertation was completed in 2005 and entitled “Peacemaking and Nonviolent Resistance. A Study of the Complementarity between Conflict Resolution Processes and Nonviolent Intervention, with Special Reference to the Case of Israel-Palestine.” Since that time, she has produced cutting-edge research on both dimensions of conflict transformation.

In her 13 years at Berghof Foundation, she has contributed to advancing conceptual, practical and policy knowledge on inclusive peace processes and post-war transitions, and has also remained deeply engaged in research, teaching and training on nonviolent resistance around the world. Through her consultancy, Veronique has an extensive network within international organizations (such as UNDP, UN DPA, EU Parliament and EEAS, World Bank, OECD-DAC).

Ambassador Jalil Jilani

Ambassador Jalil Abbas Jilani has 38 years of bilateral and multilateral experience as a career diplomat, having served as Pakistan’s Ambassador to the United States, Belgium, Luxemburg and the E.U, and Australia. Amb. Jilani also served as the Foreign Secretary of Pakistan, the top civil service official in the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. A specialist in South Asian affairs, Ambassador Jilani has worked as Director India, Director General, South Asia and SAARC in the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Acting High Commissioner of Pakistan to India. In 2018, the Government of Pakistan nominated Ambassador Jilani as member of the Eminent Persons Group of the ASEAN Regional Forum.

Ambassador Jilani is one of two former senior officials, one from Pakistan and one from India, who will craft a high-profile document that will inform regional and U.S. leaders on the way forward in the decades-long conflict between the two countries and provide a template for future engagement on the issue by the U.S. Institute of Peace Asia Center and the Institute overall. This effort will contribute to USIP’s strategic objective to provide analytical resources to a global network of practitioners in civil society, academics and governmental partners working to prevent or resolve violent conflict.

Dr. Tara Kartha

Dr. Tara Kartha is a Distinguished Fellow at the Institute of Peace and Conflict Research in New Delhi, India. From 2000 – 2017, she was the Director of the National Security Council Secretariat for the Government of India. Dr. Kartha has more than 30 years of experience in national security policy making and security analyses; two decades in various leadership capacities in the National Security Council Secretariat, Prime Minister’s Office (Government of India) under the tenure of five consecutive National Security Advisors, and nearly ten years at the Institute of Defense Studies & Analyses, New Delhi.

Dr. Kartha is one of two former senior officials, one from Pakistan and one from India, who will craft a high-profile document that will inform regional and U.S. leaders on the way forward in the decades-long conflict between the two countries and provide a template for future engagement on the issue by the U.S. Institute of Peace Asia Center and the Institute overall. This effort will contribute to USIP’s strategic objective to provide analytical resources to a global network of practitioners in civil society, academics and governmental partners working to prevent or resolve violent conflict.

Ambassador Hesham Youssef

Ambassador Hesham Youssef is a career diplomat and former Assistant Secretary General for Humanitarian Affairs at the Organization of Islamic Cooperation (2014-2019). From 2001-2014, he served in the Arab League as Official Spokesman, and, later, the Chief of Staff to Secretary General Amr Moussa, from 2003- 2011. From 2012-2014, Ambassador Youssef was a Senior Advisor to the Secretary General of the Arab League, Dr. Nabil Elaraby. Amb. Youssef advisied on issues pertaining to crisis management as well as the reform of the Arab League.

He was a member of the Egyptian negotiating team in the Multilateral Middle East Peace Negotiations as part of the Madrid Process, and has remained heavily engaged on this issue, including in Track II regional security forums. Ambassador Youssef joined the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Egypt in 1985 and was posted to the Egyptian Embassy in Canada (1988-1992) and the Egyptian Mission in Geneva where he focused mainly on economic and trade issues in the United Nations and the World Trade Organization (1995-1999). He was a member of the Cabinet of the Egyptian Minister for Foreign Affairs from 1992-1995 and 1999-2001.

Ambassador Youssef is a central part of the USIP Israeli-Palestinian Conflict Program’s effort to study the changing geopolitical context surrounding Israeli-Palestinian peacemaking. Ambassador Youssef will be instrumental in a USIP and Rice University Baker Institute for Public Policy partnership study group on the issue. The project will consider bilateral and multilateral progress on the peace process and aims to generate multi-stakeholder-directed recommendations for preventing deterioration and promoting progress toward resolving the Israeli-Palestinian and broader Arab-Israeli conflicts.