Timing
How to Deal with Pakistan?

How to Deal with Pakistan?

Date: Wednesday, October 18, 2017 / Time: 3:00pm - 4:30pm

The new U.S. effort to stabilize Afghanistan includes a more confrontational approach toward neighboring Pakistan. What are the advantages and costs of that approach, and how should the United States now calibrate its engagement with Pakistan? On October 18, USIP held this discussion. Four senior American officials, who collectively have worked through decades of turbulent U.S.-Pakistan relations, debated these questions and the impact of the new U.S. approach on Pakistan and the region.

Mediation, Negotiation & Dialogue; Global Policy

Pakistan’s Foreign Minister on Relations with the U.S.

Pakistan’s Foreign Minister on Relations with the U.S.

Date: Thursday, October 5, 2017 / Time: 9:30am - 11:00am

President Trump’s August 21 announcement of a new strategy for Afghanistan and South Asia has unsettled U.S.-Pakistan relations, with serious implications for U.S. interests in Afghanistan, nuclear non-proliferation, and stability in the region. On October 5, USIP held a discussion with Pakistani Foreign Minister Khawaja Asif—Pakistan’s first public, high-level engagement with the U.S. policy community in Washington on the new strategy.

Global Policy; Conflict Analysis & Prevention

Key Elements for a Stable Pakistan

Key Elements for a Stable Pakistan

Date: Monday, May 1, 2017 / Time: 2:30pm - 4:00pm

On May 1, former Pakistani Finance Minister Shahid Javed Burki and other experts discussed economic, demographic, climate and security challenges in Pakistan and their implications for U.S. policy.

Economics & Environment; Youth

Pakistani Minister on China’s Economic Corridor (CPEC)

Pakistani Minister on China’s Economic Corridor (CPEC)

Date: Friday, February 3, 2017 / Time: 10:00am - 11:30am

Pakistan’s minister of planning and economic development, Ahsan Iqbal—the cabinet official overseeing CPEC in his country—discussed this massive project at the U.S. Institute of Peace on February 3. Mr. Iqbal spoke to Pakistan’s outlook on its progress, its potential challenges and its implications for U.S.-Pakistan relations.

Conflict Analysis & Prevention; Economics & Environment

Pakistan, U.S. Relations—and a New Administration

Pakistan, U.S. Relations—and a New Administration

Date: Monday, January 30, 2017 / Time: 8:30am - 10:00am

President-elect Trump’s surprise November phone conversation with Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif underscored Pakistan’s continuing importance to U.S. interests in a stable South Asia. The new U.S. administration can expect to see this vital country hold national elections within 18 months. On January 30, the U.S. Institute of Peace hosted a conversation with Bilawal Bhutto Zardari, chairman of the Pakistan Peoples Party, the largest opposition party in parliament. The discussion addressed Pakistan’s serious internal security challenges; debate among Pakistani civilian and military leaders over the country’s domestic counterterrorism initiatives; and Pakistan’s broader political and democratic dynamics. As a new U.S. administration and Congress begin work, Mr. Bhutto Zardari also shared his perspective on the two countries’ relationship.

Conflict Analysis & Prevention; Global Policy