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Marc Sommers, an internationally recognized expert on youth with research experience in more than 20 war-affected countries, examined the forces that shape and propel the lives of African youth today, particularly those experiencing or emerging from violent conflict, for his recent book The Outcast Majority: War, Development, and Youth in Africa.  Please join the U.S. Institute of Peace by webcast on Wednesday, Sept. 7, for a discussion with Sommers as part of USIP's 60 days of focus on youth, peace and equality. 

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Sommers will address what works in youth-focused development policies and practices on the African continent. The webcast audience is invited to submit questions and comments via Twitter using the hashtag #YouthPeaceEquality. 

The author has published extensively on youth, conflict, education, gender and development issues, and has provided analysis and technical advice to policy institutes, donors and United Nations agencies, and non-governmental organizations. He taught for many years at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University in Medford, Massachusetts, and has been a fellow at USIP and the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. 

USIP’s 60-day initiatives draws attention to the potential of youths to contribute to peace, especially in the area of gender equality. The effort began on International Youth Day on Aug. 12, and continues through the International Day of Peace on Sept. 21 and on to the International Day of the Girl Child on Oct. 11.

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