Error message

Women are an important part of the peacebuilding equation. Too often they are excluded or marginalized in the peace process. Limiting or excluding women in the peacebuilding process not only leaves a critical resource untapped but also hinders a society's recovery. Admission fee is required.

*Attendance fee is required: free for ASIL and participating sponsor organization members; please indicate your organization affiliation when registering. $15 for nonmembers.

Women are an important part of the peacebuilding equation. Too often they are excluded or marginalized in the peace process. Limiting or excluding women in the peacebuilding process not only leaves a critical resource untapped but also hinders a society's recovery. Women can be agents of change, advocates for justice and peace, and leaders in reestablishing rule of law.

Panelists at this event will discuss the critical role of women in peacebuilding as well as comment on the recent UN Security Council report on Resolution 1820 on women, peace, and security.

Speakers

  • Melanne Verveer
    U.S. Ambassador-at-Large for Global Women's Issues
    Co-Founder and former CEO of Vital Voices
  • Swanee Hunt
    Chair of the Institute for Inclusive Security (formerly Women Waging Peace)
  • Melanne A. Civic, Program Chair and Moderator
    Special Advisor to the Center for Complex Operations at the National Defense University, seconded from the U.S. Secretary of State's Office of the Coordinator for Reconstruction and Stabilization
    Co-Chair of ASIL's Transitional Justice and Rule of Law Interest Group

Related Publications

Women's Access to Justice in Afghanistan

Women's Access to Justice in Afghanistan

Thursday, July 17, 2014

By: Erica Gaston; Tim Luccaro

Since the fall of the Taliban in 2002, gains in women’s rights and access to justice in Afghanistan have been remarkable, yet women’s rights remain extremely limited. How do women in Afghanistan seek justice when their rights are violated? What barriers do they face in pursuing justice or receiving a fair outcome? This report draws on interviews and focus group discussions held in Afghanistan in 2011 and 2012 to determine answers to these and related questions and to recommend ways forward. ...

Gender

Criminalizing Sexual Exploitation and Abuse by Peacekeepers

Criminalizing Sexual Exploitation and Abuse by Peacekeepers

Thursday, August 29, 2013

By: Carla Ferstman

UN peacekeepers continue to engage in sexual exploitation and abuse during deployment and rarely face punishment, according to human rights lawyer and Jennings Randolph fellow Carla Ferstman. Although troop-contributing countries bear responsibility for investigating and prosecuting these crimes, the UN must shoulder an active, persistent role in helping states close the gaps in disciplinary and criminal accountability in order to end peacekeeper impunity.

Gender

View All Publications