Major General Robert Caslen, recently returned from Iraq, where he served as commanding general of Multinational Division - North, discussed the strategic relationship between the U.S. and Iraq post-2011.

Major General Robert Caslen recently returned from Iraq, where he served as commanding general of Multinational Division – North. This area of operations includes Ninewa, Kirkuk and other volatile areas along the Arab-Kurd fault line.

He discussed the security implications of the impending U.S. withdrawal, prospects for peaceful resolution of the Arab-Kurd conflict, and what the strategic relationship between the U.S. and Iraq looks like post-2011. 

Speakers 

  • Major General Robert Caslen
    Former commander of Multinational Division – North in Iraq
  • Ambassador William B. Taylor, Moderator
    Vice President, Center for Post-Conflict Peace and Stability Operations, U.S. Institute of Peace

 

 

 

 

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