The United States is facing ever-evolving threats across Europe, the Middle East and South Asia. On February 13, the U.S. Institute of Peace hosted a conversation with Douglas Lute — former Ambassador to NATO, retired Army lieutenant general, and National Security Council official in both the Bush and Obama administrations — to explore the changing security landscape in the 21st century. He has been deeply involved in developing U.S. policy and military strategy for decades. So what are looming conflicts ahead? How are the United States and the world’s largest military alliance adapting to deal with them? Is the U.S. role in NATO changing?

Robin Wright and Ambassador Douglas Lute
Robin Wright and Ambassador Douglas Lute

Ambassador Lute retired in January of 2017 after more than three years as U.S. Ambassador to NATO. He helped develop policy on Iraq, Afghanistan and Pakistan from 2007 until 2013. Prior to the White House, Lute served as the Director of Operations on the Joint Staff, overseeing U.S. military operations worldwide, and as Director of Operations at U.S. Central Command. Lute retired from the U.S. Army as a lieutenant general in 2010 after 35 years on active duty. He holds degrees from the United States Military Academy at West Point and Harvard University.

Related Publications

Why the New U.S.-U.K.-Australia Partnership Is So Significant

Why the New U.S.-U.K.-Australia Partnership Is So Significant

Friday, September 17, 2021

By: Brian Harding; Carla Freeman, Ph.D; Mirna Galic; Henry Tugendhat; Rachel Vandenbrink

The United States and the United Kingdom have made the rare decision to share nuclear submarine propulsion technology with Australia in a move seen aimed at China. In a joint statement on September 15, the leaders of the United States, the United Kingdom and Australia announced the formation of a trilateral partnership — AUKUS — that, among other things, seeks to “strengthen the ability of each to support our security and defense interests.” USIP’s Brian Harding, Carla Freeman, Mirna Galic, Henry Tugendhat and Rachel Vandenbrink discuss the significance of the decision and what to expect next.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Global Policy

Twenty Years After 9/11, It’s Time to Prioritize Diplomacy and Development

Twenty Years After 9/11, It’s Time to Prioritize Diplomacy and Development

Monday, September 13, 2021

By: Mona Yacoubian

As we mark the somber 20th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks amid a global pandemic, the complexity of 21st century national security threats is all too evident. Another milestone — the end of the U.S. military intervention in Afghanistan — underscores the shortcomings of the United States response to this tragic terrorist attack: large-scale military interventions. We have seen that these multifaceted, transnational threats demand a whole-of-government approach with diplomacy, peacebuilding and development at the forefront. Twenty years after 9/11, as the United States pivots away from a “forever wars” posture, a renewed commitment to upgrade our diplomacy, peacebuilding and development toolkits should be prioritized. 

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Global Policy

View All Publications