The United States is facing ever-evolving threats across Europe, the Middle East and South Asia. On February 13, the U.S. Institute of Peace hosted a conversation with Douglas Lute — former Ambassador to NATO, retired Army lieutenant general, and National Security Council official in both the Bush and Obama administrations — to explore the changing security landscape in the 21st century. He has been deeply involved in developing U.S. policy and military strategy for decades. So what are looming conflicts ahead? How are the United States and the world’s largest military alliance adapting to deal with them? Is the U.S. role in NATO changing?

Robin Wright and Ambassador Douglas Lute
Robin Wright and Ambassador Douglas Lute

Ambassador Lute retired in January of 2017 after more than three years as U.S. Ambassador to NATO. He helped develop policy on Iraq, Afghanistan and Pakistan from 2007 until 2013. Prior to the White House, Lute served as the Director of Operations on the Joint Staff, overseeing U.S. military operations worldwide, and as Director of Operations at U.S. Central Command. Lute retired from the U.S. Army as a lieutenant general in 2010 after 35 years on active duty. He holds degrees from the United States Military Academy at West Point and Harvard University.

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