Afghanistan is at an important moment in its history. Despite a persistent insurgency that continues to control and destabilize roughly half of the country, high levels of voter enthusiasm in the recent parliamentary elections demonstrated that the people of Afghanistan remain invested in the future of their democracy. Amid a renewed focus on political reconciliation and the upcoming presidential elections in April, citizens face important choices about Afghanistan’s future stability and prosperity. 

These and other pressing issues facing Afghanistan are the subject of The Asia Foundation’s 2018 Survey of the Afghan People. Please join The Asia Foundation and the U.S. Institute of Peace on Tuesday, December 4, for a presentation on the key findings, and a panel discussion on the trends and shifts in the views of Afghan citizens from past years. Join the conversation on Twitter with #AfghanSurvey.

The annual survey is based on face-to-face interviews with a nationally representative sample of more than 15,000 citizens across all 34 Afghan provinces. The results reveal citizens’ views on a wide range of crucial issues, including security, the economy, corruption, justice, youth issues, reconciliation with the Taliban, access to media, the role of women, governance and political participation. This year’s survey also includes new questions related to local security, access to government services, and elections. 

First commissioned in 2004, the survey provides an unmatched barometer of Afghan public opinion over time and a unique resource for policymakers and the international community, the Afghan government, and the broader public in Afghanistan.

Speakers

Nancy Lindborg, welcoming remarks
President, U.S Institute of Peace

Scott Worden, moderator
Director, Afghanistan and Central Asia Programs, U.S. Institute of Peace

Tabasum Akseer
Director of Policy & Research in Afghanistan, The Asia Foundation 

Amb. Daniel F. Feldman
Former Special Representative for Afghanistan and Pakistan (SRAP) at the U.S. Department of State; Asia Foundation Trustee; and Partner, Akin Gump

Abdullah Ahmadzai
Country Representative in Afghanistan, The Asia Foundation 

Related Publications

Legislature and Legislative Elections in Afghanistan: An Analysis

Legislature and Legislative Elections in Afghanistan: An Analysis

Wednesday, July 8, 2020

By: A. Farid Tookhy

Afghanistan’s newest Wolesi Jirga—the lower house of the National Assembly—boasts a younger and more educated membership than those elected in either 2005 or 2010. Its representativeness, however, is uneven and problematic. This report offers a comparative profile of the Wolesi Jirgas elected in 2005, 2010, and 2018, highlighting issues salient to the reforms Afghanistan needs to undertake if it is to hold credible national elections that yield truly representative elected institutions.

Type: Special Report

Democracy & Governance

U.S., Russian interests overlap in Afghanistan. So, why offer bounties to the Taliban?

U.S., Russian interests overlap in Afghanistan. So, why offer bounties to the Taliban?

Tuesday, July 7, 2020

By: Andrew Wilder

Recent intelligence reports indicating that Russian bounties paid to the Taliban to kill U.S. troops have bolstered American and Afghan officials long-held allegations that Moscow has been engaged in clandestine operations to undermine the U.S. mission in Afghanistan. Russia’s support for the Taliban, however, has largely been tactical in nature. Both Washington and Moscow ultimately have a converging strategic interest in a relatively stable Afghanistan without a long-term U.S. presence that will not be a haven for transnational terrorists. USIP’s Andrew Wilder looks at what this means for the decades-long Afghan conflict.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Conflict Analysis & Prevention; Global Policy

Negotiations Are the Only Way to End Afghan Conflict, Says Abdullah

Negotiations Are the Only Way to End Afghan Conflict, Says Abdullah

Thursday, June 25, 2020

By: Adam Gallagher

The head of Afghanistan’s new peace council said yesterday that he is optimistic that intra-Afghan talks can start in the coming weeks, but increased levels of violence and details of prisoner releases may slow the start of talks. Chairman Abdullah added that the government’s negotiating team will be inclusive and represent common values in talks with the Taliban. The team “will be diverse and represent all walks of life,” Abdullah said. Afghans and analysts have expressed concern that without an inclusive negotiating team, the country’s hard-won, democratic gains could be compromised for the sake of a deal with the Taliban.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Democracy & Governance; Peace Processes

View All Publications