Error message

Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs Wendy Sherman discussed a new U.S. policy to advance peace, stability and development in Somalia at USIP on June 3rd.

Read the event analysis, Somalia Slated for First U.S. Ambassador in Two Decades

Photo Credit: UN Photo/Stuart Price

Speakers

  • Wendy Sherman
    Under Secretary of State, Political Affairs
  • Ambassador Johnnie Carson, Moderator
    Senior Advisor to the President, U.S. Institute of Peace

Join the conversation on Twitter with #USIPSomalia.

Related Publications

Community Policing against Violent Extremism Reveals Common Factors

Community Policing against Violent Extremism Reveals Common Factors

Monday, May 19, 2014

By: Nathaniel L. Wilson

From Northern Ireland to Somalia to Pakistan, police leaders and ministry officials attending a series of courses that USIP co-hosted on community policing expressed surprise that they faced common challenges -- from the threat of violent extremism and from the complexities of their own organizations.

The Essential Role of Women Peacekeepers

The Essential Role of Women Peacekeepers

Wednesday, May 2, 2012

By: Mary Hope Schwoebel

As peacekeeping evolves to encompass a broader humanitarian approach and mandates for protection of civilians, women are increasingly deployed in all peacekeeping domains—police, military, and civilian. They have made a positive impact on peacekeeping environments by supporting the role of women in building peace and by protecting women's rights.

Gender; Mediation, Negotiation & Dialogue; Education & Training

Fighting Serious Crimes

Fighting Serious Crimes

Wednesday, May 24, 2017

By: Colette Rausch; Editor

Fighting Serious Crimes: Strategies and Tactics for Conflict-Affected Societies is an invaluable resource for anyone battling serious crimes in societies seeking to avoid conflict, to escape from violence, or to recover and rebuild. Packed with practical guidance, this volume includes real world examples from more than twenty of today’s conflict zones, including Libya, Yemen, Iraq, Afghanistan, Somalia, and Colombia.

Justice, Security & Rule of Law

How Drought Escalates Rebel Killings of Civilians

How Drought Escalates Rebel Killings of Civilians

Wednesday, May 24, 2017

By: Ore Koren

The 2011 famine in Somalia, caused by a prolonged drought, killed an estimated 260,000 people. But this was more than a natural disaster. Amid the starvation, food shortages prompted rebels of al-Shabab, the armed group fighting Somalia’s government and spreading terror abroad, to attack local farmers to seize their food reserves, causing even more civilian deaths. It’s a pattern that plays out in rural regions across the developing world.

Human Rights; Fragility and Resilience; Violent Extremism

View All Publications