From Algeria to Sudan to Zimbabwe, Africans—particularly youth—are mobilizing to demand responsive, accountable governments and the opportunity to live productive lives. Meanwhile, unprecedented demographic shifts and mass migration are creating complex challenges for African nations, with an estimated 24.2 million people forcibly displaced from their homes in 2017. African communities, cities, states, and countries are adapting to these dynamics in various ways. But moving forward, policymakers in the U.S. and Africa face the imperative of adapting to these shifts and charting a new partnership.

 Children play over a fallen Baobab in Kaolack Region, Senegal. (Tomas Munita/The New York Times)
Children play over a fallen Baobab in Kaolack Region, Senegal. (Tomas Munita/The New York Times)

Both the U.S. and Africa have shown a commitment to developing a new approach. The African Union is undertaking an ambitious reform process to advance economic integration, including the formation of the African Continental Free Trade Union and strengthening the African Peace and Security Architecture to better address conflict, prevent violence, and reduce the number of people being forcibly displaced

Meanwhile, the U.S. is shifting its policies toward Africa, using the 2018 BUILD Act as an anchor. The White House unveiled its new Africa strategy in December 2018, and Congress is engaged in intensive discussions regarding the Global Fragility Act , the Prosper Africa Initiative, and the Women’s Global Development and Prosperity Initiative. These shifts are complemented by the long-standing relationships between the U.S. government and NGOs, universities, and the African diaspora. 

Join the U.S. Institute of Peace, the Africa Center for Strategic Studies, and the Office of the Director of National Intelligence for a forum with U.S. and African policy leaders and experts. The forum will examine trends that are affecting the African continent and explore opportunities for strategic engagement with the U.S. Follow the conversation with #USAfricaPartnerships.

Please stay tuned for more details and speaker announcements.

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