Hamadi Jebali has often been called the Nelson Mandela of Tunisia, after spending 17 years in prison. He became the first prime minister after Tunisia's revolution.

HamadiJebal
H.E. Mr. Hamadi Jebali, Secretary General, Ennahda Party, Former Prime Minister of the Tunisian Republic

Jabali resigned in February after a dispute with his own party over his proposal for a broader coalition government, his solution to public protests after the assassination of an opposition politician. He is now secretary-general of the ruling Ennahda Party. He is also a leading candidate for the presidency in elections due this fall. Over the past few months, most media coverage on Tunisia has focused on the growing challenges posed by radical Salafists and the escalating tensions between different social and political forces striving to shape the country's new political terrain.

In his only public event in Washington, on June 3, 2013 from 9:45 to 11:00am, USIP held a discussion with Jebali about the challenges the region's new democracies face two years later and the possible solutions.

Speakers

Kristin Lord, Opening Remarks
Executive Vice President, U.S. Institute of Peace

H.E. Mr. Hamadi Jebali, Keynote Address
Secretary General, Ennahda Party
Former Prime Minister of the Tunisian Republic

Charles Dunne, Moderator and Discussant
Director of Middle East and North Africa Programs, Freedom House

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