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Dr. Chaiwat Satha-Anand, a prominent nonviolent activist and scholar from Thammasat University in Bangkok, Thailand, joined us for a conversation on the subject of transforming radical extremism with principles of nonviolence action.

 

The violent and nonviolent protests around the Muslim world regarding the anti-Islamic film, "Innocence of Muslims," have reinvigorated the debate over the prevalence of nonviolent practices in Islamic communities. With religious extremists and zealous secularists posing serious threats to societies, it is critically important to examine the ethos of pluralism, peacebuilding activities, and the culture of sustainable peace in conflict zones in Muslim-majority countries.

Dr. Chaiwat Satha-Anand, a prominent nonviolent activist and scholar from Thammasat University in Bangkok, Thailand, joined us for a conversation on the subject of transforming radical extremism with principles of nonviolent action. Has the rise of extremist voices weakened principles of nonviolence and moderation in Muslim communities? Are moderate Muslims capable of defeating extremism with nonviolent practices of tolerance, social justice, and education? Drs. Satha-Anand, Kadayifci-Orellana and Huda explored these and other questions.

USIP’s efforts in the Middle East and larger Muslim world have aided in developing the capacity of civil society actors in peacebuilding and conflict management. Whether it be a peace education curriculum for madrasas in Pakistan, or an inter-faith mediation center in Nigeria, or a gender peacebuilding training toolkit in Iraq, USIP’s on-the-ground field work and research aims to resolve conflicts through nonviolent means.

Speakers

  • Qamar-ul Huda, Moderator
    Editor of "Crescent and Dove: Peace & Conflict Resolution in Islam"
    U.S. Institute of Peace
  • Chaiwat Satha-Anand, Speaker
    Professor, Faculty of Political Science 
    Thammasat University, Thailand
  • Ayse Kadayifci-Orellana, Discussant
    Visiting Assistant Professor, MA Program in Conflict Resolution
    Georgetown University

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