The Ukrainian government has pledged to undertake a major campaign to root out corruption. But a year after the departure of former President Yanukovych, the pace of reform continues to drag. USIP hosted a panel discussion on Tuesday, March 3, that evaluated the prospects for reducing corruption in Ukraine and how change could be accelerated.

Can Ukraine Change
Pictured from left to right, William Taylor, Colin Cleary, Edward Chow, Adrian Karatnycky, Robert Orttung, George Kent

Panelists examined prospects for reform of the energy, judicial and regulatory sectors, among others, while conflict rages in the country’s East. The discussion gauged the political will of the Ukrainian leadership and the risks of a public backlash, and explore the role of the media and civil society in the reform effort. The panel also looked at the assistance required from international financial institutions and donors.

This event was part of a larger USIP effort to analyze the impact of the Ukraine conflict for the broader region.

Speakers

William Taylor, Opening Remarks
Acting USIP Executive Vice President and Former U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine

Edward Chow
Senior Fellow, Energy and Security Program, Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS)

Adrian Karatnycky
Senior Fellow, Atlantic Council

Robert Orttung
Assistant Director, Institute of European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, The George Washington University

Inna Pidluska
Deputy Executive Director, Kyiv Office, International Renaissance Foundation (via Skype)

George Kent
Senior Anti-Corruption Coordinator, Bureau of European and Eurasian Affairs, Department of State

Colin Cleary, Moderator
USIP Interagency Fellow

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