Error message

On September 7, 2011, the U.S. Institute of Peace was pleased to host Assistant Secretary of State Esther Brimmer to discuss the multilateral side of U.S. foreign policy and the Obama administration's efforts at the United Nations, including the administration's priorities for the upcoming U.N. General Assembly session.

 

The United States faces increasing global challenges while at the same time grappling with pressure to decrease the foreign affairs budget. This has reinvigorated debates about how to promote U.S. global interests most effectively and efficiently. How central should formal multilateral diplomacy be to U.S. foreign policy? How much should the United States invest in the United Nations and other international organizations?

On September 7, 2011, the U.S. Institute of Peace was pleased to host Assistant Secretary of State Esther Brimmer to discuss the multilateral side of U.S. foreign policy and the Obama administration's efforts at the U.N., including the administration's priorities for the upcoming U.N. General Assembly session. Dr. Brimmer addressed important challenges - from integrating the growing influence of emerging powers, to ensuring the U.N. is strong enough to bear the burden placed on it - and made the case that working with international organizations pays dividends for the United States and benefits the American people, by providing a means for addressing shared global challenges.

A full version of Dr. Brimmer's speech is available online

Featuring

Explore Further

Related Academy Courses

 

Related Publications

USIP’s Work on the ISIS Threat

USIP’s Work on the ISIS Threat

Monday, April 17, 2017

By:

The U.S. Institute of Peace has operated on the ground in Iraq since 2003 and in Afghanistan since 2002, as well as in Libya, Nigeria, Syria, Tunisia, and Yemen. As a small, agile institution, USIP works with local leaders and the U.S. government, including the military, to stabilize areas devastated by ISIS, end cycles of revenge, and address the root causes of radicalization, including corrupt and abusive governance.

Violent Extremism; Conflict Analysis & Prevention

Q&A: Will U.S. Strikes on Syria Change Conflict’s Course?

Q&A: Will U.S. Strikes on Syria Change Conflict’s Course?

Friday, April 7, 2017

By: USIP Staff

The United States launched its first air strikes against forces backing Syrian President Bashar al-Assad since the country’s civil war began six years ago, in retaliation for a chemical-weapons attack that killed more than 80 civilian men, women and children. Elie Abouaoun, who is director of Middle East and North Africa programs at the U.S. Institute of Peace and is based in the region, examines the strategic implications, and USIP President Nancy Lindborg, who has worked for nearly 30 years on humanitarian crises and areas affected by conflict, comments on the factors that prompted the U.S. attack.

Conflict Analysis & Prevention; Violent Extremism; Global Policy

Returning Foreign Fighters and the Reintegration Imperative

Returning Foreign Fighters and the Reintegration Imperative

Wednesday, March 22, 2017

By: Georgia Holmer; Adrian Shtuni

This report aims to help policymakers and practitioners navigate the challenges of developing effective programs to rehabilitate and reintegrate foreign fighters returning from Syria and Iraq into their societies. Ultimately, holistic and comprehensive reintegration efforts designed to transition returnees address not only their needs, but also those of the entire society, and are critical in building more resilient and safer communities.

Violent Extremism; Justice, Security & Rule of Law; Conflict Analysis & Prevention

America’s Role in the World

America’s Role in the World

Tuesday, March 21, 2017

By: Stephen J. Hadley

In our testimony, we would like to offer our perspective on the current challenges to the international system, share some insights relevant to this topic from our Middle East Strategy Task Force, and suggest some ways in which Congress might be able to help forge a new bipartisan consensus on American foreign policy.

Conflict Analysis & Prevention

View All Publications