The U.S. has redoubled its efforts to facilitate a peace process that will end the conflict in Afghanistan, protect U.S. national security interests, and strengthen Afghanistan’s sovereignty. As President Trump said in the State of the Union address, “my administration is holding constructive talks with a number of Afghan groups, including the Taliban. As we make progress in these negotiations, we will be able to reduce our troop presence and focus on counterterrorism.”

USIP is pleased to host Special Representative for Afghanistan Reconciliation Ambassador Zalmay Khalilzad for his first public event since becoming the special representative. His remarks will discuss recent progress and challenges to advance a peace process in Afghanistan, and will be followed by a discussion with USIP Board Chair and former National Security Advisor Stephen J. Hadley.

Follow @USIP and join the conversation on Twitter with #AfgPeace.

Speakers

The Honorable Nancy Lindborg, opening remarks
President & CEO, U.S Institute of Peace

Zalmay Khalilzad, keynote address
Special Representative for Afghanistan Reconciliation, U.S Department of State; Former U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations, Afghanistan and Iraq

The Honorable Stephen J. Hadley, moderator
Chair, Board of Directors, U.S Institute of Peace 

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