Error message

Sheikh Dr. Muhammad Tahir-ul-Qadri discussed his fatwa against Al-Qaida, Taliban, and other radical organizations and how he and his organizations have been working toward reducing the spread of extremism.

Since the September 11th attacks against the U.S. and terrorist attacks around the globe, many have consistently asked “Where are the moderate Muslims?” and “Why do they not speak out?” While terrorists have justified their acts through the misinterpretation of Islamic teachings these events have contributed to a greater gap between the west and Islam. Sheikh Dr. Muhammad Tahir-ul-Qadri, one of Pakistan’s most prominent religious authorities with a global following, recently issued a 600 page religious ruling (fatwa) condemning the perpetrators and their ideology of radicalism. His work is considered to be one of the most comprehensive and forceful condemnations of terrorism to date by any Muslim religious leader.

Sheikh Dr. Muhammad Tahir-ul-Qadri discussed his fatwa against Al-Qaida, Taliban, and other radical organizations and how he and his organizations have been working toward reducing the spread of extremism. He has explicitly declared terrorism as an act of disbelief (kufr) in Islam, and his peacebuilding activities are bringing youth away from radical ideology.

As a trained jurist, Sheikh Dr. Muhammad Tahir-ul- Qadri has authored around 1,000 books out of which more than 450 have been published. As an unrivaled orator and speaker, he has delivered over 6,000 lectures and has been teaching Islamic subjects such as jurisprudence, theology, sufism, Islamic philosophy, law, Islamic politics, hadith, seerah, and many other traditional sciences.

Speakers

Related Publications

Crescent and Dove

Crescent and Dove

Friday, October 1, 2010

By: Qamar-ul Huda

Crescent and Dove looks at the relationship between contemporary Islam and peacemaking by tackling the diverse interpretations, concepts, and problems in the field of Islamic peacemaking. It addresses both theory and practice by delving into the intellectual heritage of Islam to discuss historical examples of addressing conflict in Islam and exploring the practical challenges of contemporary peacemaking in Arab countries, Turkey, Iran, Pakistan, and Indonesia.

Religion

Eye on USIP's Religion and Peacemaking Center

Tuesday, November 8, 2011

Religion is often seen as the cause of strife around the globe, but in reality, it can provide the foundation for what helps to end conflict. USIP’s work, from Indonesia to Pakistan, demonstrates that religion can play a positive role in managing conflict. USIP’s David Smock, senior vice president for the Centers of Innovation, explores the issue in this brief question-and-answer.

Religion

NGOs and Nonstate Armed Actors

NGOs and Nonstate Armed Actors

Tuesday, July 26, 2011

By: Claudia Hofmann; Ulrich Schneckener

Two seasoned NGOs engage nonstate combatants on international human rights law to get them to change behaviors, from eliminating use of landmines to protecting civilians. Their work can inform and complement other attempts at engagement.

Mediation, Negotiation & Dialogue

View All Publications