As China continues to expand its global reach, the Washington-Beijing relationship has become increasingly tense. From trade disputes, to North Korea, to technological innovation, the two nations are contending for influence in similar spaces, but with drastically different objectives, setting the stage for long-term competition that raises difficult questions about the future of U.S. foreign policy. To examine these challenges, Senator Mark R. Warner (D-VA) has been convening public-private sector meetings, bringing together congressional, intelligence community, business, and academic leaders to spark this important dialogue.

On September 23, USIP hosted Sen. Warner for remarks on the state of U.S. competition with China. Sen. Warner discussed the importance of U.S. leadership at home, through public-private partnerships, and abroad, with partners and allies. He also discussed the strategies and tactics used by Beijing to control technologies of the future and dominate specific economic sectors, the meaning of Beijing’s growing influence, and how the U.S. can respond to China’s undermining of open, competitive economies and democratic values. Continue the conversation on Twitter with #SenWarneratUSIP.

Speakers

Sen. Mark R. Warner (D-VA)
U.S. Senator from Virginia
@MarkWarner

The Honorable Nancy Lindborg, moderator
President & CEO, U.S. Institute of Peace
@NancyLindborg

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