As China continues to expand its global reach, the Washington-Beijing relationship has become increasingly tense. From trade disputes, to North Korea, to technological innovation, the two nations are contending for influence in similar spaces, but with drastically different objectives, setting the stage for long-term competition that raises difficult questions about the future of U.S. foreign policy. To examine these challenges, Senator Mark R. Warner (D-VA) has been convening public-private sector meetings, bringing together congressional, intelligence community, business, and academic leaders to spark this important dialogue.

On September 23, USIP hosted Sen. Warner for remarks on the state of U.S. competition with China. Sen. Warner discussed the importance of U.S. leadership at home, through public-private partnerships, and abroad, with partners and allies. He also discussed the strategies and tactics used by Beijing to control technologies of the future and dominate specific economic sectors, the meaning of Beijing’s growing influence, and how the U.S. can respond to China’s undermining of open, competitive economies and democratic values. Continue the conversation on Twitter with #SenWarneratUSIP.

Speakers

Sen. Mark R. Warner (D-VA)
U.S. Senator from Virginia
@MarkWarner

Nancy Lindborg, moderator
President and CEO, U.S. Institute of Peace
@NancyLindborg

Related Publications

Senator Mark Warner: Meeting the Challenge of China

Senator Mark Warner: Meeting the Challenge of China

Thursday, September 26, 2019

By: Fred Strasser

China today is seeking to erode U.S. power and influence globally through economic, military, technological and political influence strategies, U.S. Senator Mark Warner said. The United States should respond not by reverting to a simplistic “new Cold War” frame, but by bolstering security at home and working with allies and partners abroad to reinforce the existing international order and make America more competitive.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Democracy & Governance; Global Policy

China Trade War: Risks and Strategies

China Trade War: Risks and Strategies

Wednesday, September 18, 2019

By: USIP Staff

The chances that trade talks scheduled to resume with China next month will result in any broad agreement with the U.S. are slim to none, said two members of a bipartisan congressional panel focused on U.S.-China relations. “It’s important that we keep talking,” said Rep. Rick Larsen (D-WA), the co-chair of the House of Representatives U.S.-China Working Group. “That’s a positive, but I haven’t seen anything that has changed to ensure that something would be different” when U.S. and Chinese trade officials are scheduled to sit down again in early October.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Economics & Environment; Global Policy

Despite Beijing’s Threats, Hong Kong Protesters Remain Unbowed

Despite Beijing’s Threats, Hong Kong Protesters Remain Unbowed

Wednesday, August 21, 2019

By: Patricia M. Kim; Paul Lee; Jacob Stokes; Rachel Vandenbrink

Hong Kong saw another massive rally on Sunday, with an estimated 1.7 million pro-democracy protesters taking to the streets. So far, China’s response to the protests, which started in June over a proposed bill that would have allowed extradition to mainland China, has largely consisted of a disinformation campaign and support for the Hong Kong police, which have engaged in violent beatings, extensive use of tear gas, and firing of rubber bullets to clamp down on the protesters. USIP experts discuss how the situation has evolved, the potential of Beijing conducting a violent crackdown, what the international community’s response would be, and what the U.S. can do.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Democracy & Governance

View All Publications