On November 12, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry visited the U.S. Institute to deliver a policy speech focused on Syria.

kerry

The Secretary's address outlined the Obama administration’s strategy for Syria before leaving the U.S. for a trip that includes a stop in Vienna to continue talks seeking a diplomatic solution to the country’s civil war. His visit to USIP was set at against the backdrop of diplomatic talks, which include China, Egypt, the European Union, France, Germany, Iran, Iraq, Italy, Jordan, Lebanon, Oman, Qatar, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Turkey, United Arab Emirates, the United Kingdom and the United Nations. Secretary Kerry has said the diplomatic effort and the continuing military campaign against the self-styled “Islamic State” extremist group make up a “two-pronged approach” to bringing the 4 ½-year conflict to an end. of State John Kerry .

Read his remarks as delivered.

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