A new geopolitical paradigm is emerging in the Horn of Africa: Middle Eastern states are playing an increasingly assertive role throughout the region. As Sudan and Ethiopia undergo their most significant political transitions since the Cold War—affecting the future of nearly 150 million people—the jostling for dominance among the United Arab Emirates and Saudi Arabia, on the one hand, and Turkey and Qatar, on the other, is fueling instability and insecurity in an already fractious region.

As part of the U.S. Institute of Peace’s ongoing “Red Sea Rising” multi-track initiative, USIP hosted the release of the International Crisis Group’s forthcoming report unpacking the regional goals, motivations, and often conflicting aims of Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Turkey, and the United Arab Emirates. 

The report, based on conversations with senior officials on both sides of the Red Sea, examines how outside forces are jockeying to build political influence and carve out pivotal positions in the Horn of Africa’s emerging economy. At this historic juncture for the region, Crisis Group researchers presented the report’s main findings, followed by a panel discussion with experts from the Horn of Africa and the Middle East. Continue the conversation with #RedSeaRisingUSIP.
 

Speakers

Amb. Johnnie Carson, opening remarks
Senior Advisor, U.S. Institute of Peace

Robert Malley, opening remarks
President and CEO, International Crisis Group

Elizabeth Dickinsonpresenter
Senior Analyst for the Arabian Peninsula, International Crisis Group

Dino Mahtanipresenter
Deputy Director, Africa Program, International Crisis Group

Nicholas Haysom
Special Advisor to the UN Secretary-General

Abdul Mohammed
Chief of Staff, AU High-Level Implementation Panel

Amb. Hesham Youssef
Jennings Randolph Senior Fellow, US Institute of Peace

Susan Stigant
Director, Africa, US Institute of Peace

Payton Knopf, moderator
Advisor, U.S. Institute of Peace

Additional panelists to be announced.

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