In February, India and Pakistan announced the resumption of a 2003 cease-fire along their fiercely disputed border — representing a first step toward easing tensions between the nuclear rivals. Soon after, leaders in both countries made forward-looking statements, sparking optimism for rapprochement. While bilateral progress has proven short-lived in the past, and longstanding political and security obstacles remain, could these developments open space to address the underlying drivers of conflict?

On April 22, USIP hosted a discussion on what the recent thaw between India and Pakistan reveals about each country’s strategic thinking, the region’s overarching security concerns, and opportunities for the United States to encourage confidence building and crisis management even if peace remains elusive.

Continue the conversation on Twitter with #QuietOnLOC.

Speakers

Madiha Afzal
Rubenstein Fellow, Foreign Policy, The Brookings Institution

Tanvi Madan
Senior Fellow, Foreign Policy, Brookings Institution

Shuja Nawaz
Distinguished Fellow, South Asia, Atlantic Council

Ashley Tellis
Tata Chair for Strategic Affairs, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

Tamanna Salikuddin, moderator
Director, South Asia, U.S. Institute of Peace

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