Error message

The U.S. Institute for Peace (USIP), the Arab Barometer, the Arab Reform Initiative, the Project on Middle East Democracy and the Project on Middle East Political Science cohosted a discussion and analysis of latest polling data from across the Middle East.

The Arab uprisings were a vivid demonstration of the importance of public opinion in the Middle East. Frustrated by poor governance and the lack of economic opportunity, citizens demonstrated in mass protests on the streets, and online, throughout the region. As autocrats fell, instability and extremism rose. Although democracy appears to be succeeding in Tunisia, in most of the Arab Spring countries the future is far from secure.

To learn how citizens in these countries view government, religion and economic opportunities, the U.S. Institute for Peace (USIP), the Arab Barometer, the Arab Reform Initiative, the Project on Middle East Democracy, and the Project on Middle East Political Science cohosted a discussion on how publics view the situations in their respective countries.  The event highlighted new findings from the third wave of surveys (late 2012-2014) of the Arab Barometer* across 12 Arab countries including Egypt, Tunisia, Saudi Arabia, Yemen, Iraq and more.

Featured Speakers

Amaney Jamal
Edward S. Sanford Professor of Politics
Princeton University
Non-Resident Senior Fellow, Project on Middle East Democracy

Michael Robbins
Project Director of the Arab Barometer
Princeton University and the University of Michigan

Khalil Shikaki
Director of the Palestinian Center for Policy and Survey Research
Senior Fellow at the Crown Center for Middle Eastern Studies at Brandeis University

Mark Tessler
Samuel J. Eldersveld Professor of Political Science
University of Michigan

Steven Riskin
Senior Program Officer for Grants, U.S. Institute of Peace

*The Arab Barometer was also developed in consultation with Global Barometer project, a network composed of regional barometers in Latin America, Sub-Saharan, East Asia and South Asia. Like other regional Democracy Barometers, the objectives of the Arab Barometer are to produce scientifically reliable data on the politically-relevant attitudes of ordinary citizens, to disseminate and apply survey findings in order to contribute to political reform and to strengthen institutional capacity for public opinion research.

Related Publications

Violent Conflict and Vital Interests: Keeping Focus

Violent Conflict and Vital Interests: Keeping Focus

Thursday, February 16, 2017

By: Fred Strasser

Over the next decade, the United States can expect to face complex foreign challenges from terrorism, insurgencies and internal conflicts fanned by external sponsorship, but the threat of conventional state-on-state wars, including direct assaults on the American homeland, have significantly diminished, according to retired Lt. General Douglas Lute, the former ambassador to the North Atlantic Treaty Organization.

Global Policy; Conflict Analysis & Prevention; Civilian-Military Relations

China’s Kashmir Policies and Crisis Management in South Asia

China’s Kashmir Policies and Crisis Management in South Asia

Thursday, February 9, 2017

By: I-wei Jennifer Chang

China’s policy on the Kashmir conflict between India and Pakistan has a significant impact on regional stabilization and crisis management efforts in South Asia. Beijing also plays an important third-party role in helping deescalate hostilities between the two countries. This brief discusses the evolution of China’s Kashmir policies over the past several decades and examines Chinese cooperation with the United States during periods of crises between the South Asian rivals. 

Conflict Analysis & Prevention; Global Policy

'Political Peace' Is Possible, Says AEI President

'Political Peace' Is Possible, Says AEI President

Friday, January 13, 2017

Arthur Brooks, an economist and musician who is president of the American Enterprise Institute, said the cause of the current U.S. political rifts has been misdiagnosed and outlined a prescription for achieving “maybe the most elusive kind of peace of all around the world today.” In a presentation at Passing the Baton, a conference at the U.S. Institute of Peace that was co-sponsored by his think tank and four others, Brooks declared, “Political peace is possible.”

Conflict Analysis & Prevention; Global Policy; Fragility and Resilience

View All Publications