On July 18th, the U.S. Institute of Peace and USAID hosted an expert panel, which highlighted efforts made by multilateral actors within the U.S. Government and internationally, in ensuring a commitment to the empowerment of women and girls in Afghanistan.

Securing-Future-
Panel left to right: Rangina Hamidi, Naheed Farid, Hossai Wardak, WIlliam Byrd, Palwasha Kakar

Research repeatedly shows that no nation can achieve sustainable peace, reconciliation, stability, and economic growth when half the population is marginalized. USAID and the U.S. Institute of Peace are fully committed to removing constraints on women’s potential -- their contributions to Afghan society are imperative to lasting peace, stability and economic progress. This event took stock of progress thus far, of on-going commitments to the needs of women and girls, and explored the potential impact of new programming and partnerships beyond the political and security transitions in 2014.

This event coincided with the release of the USAID Request for Proposal, "Promote," a five year program for women's empowerment in Afghanistan.

Agenda and Biographies

Welcome and Introductions:

  • Jim Marshall
    President, U.S. Institute of Peace

Keynote Speaker:

  • Rajiv Shah
    USAID Administrator

Followed by a panel including:

  • Carla Koppell, Moderator
    Chief Strategy Officer, Former Senior Coordinator on Gender, USAID
  • Kathleen Kuehnast, Panel Introductions
    Director, Center for Gender & Peacebuilding, USIP
  • William Byrd
    Afghanistan Senior Expert, U.S. Institute of Peace
  • Naheed Farid
    Member of the Afghan Parliament
  • Rangina Hamidi
    Founder, Kandahar Treasure
  • Palwasha Kakar
    Director of Women's Empowerment and Development Programs, The Asia Foundation
  • Hossai Wardak
    Afghanistan Visiting Expert, U.S. Institute of Peace

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Scott Smith on What’s Next in the Afghan Peace Process

Scott Smith on What’s Next in the Afghan Peace Process

Thursday, November 14, 2019

By: Scott Smith

The Afghan government and Taliban announced an agreement on a prisoner exchange this week, but it remains unclear what comes next. With the presidential election still undecided, “The question is if this is the beginning of a new peace strategy on the part of President Ghani, will he be the president a few months from now to carry that strategy forward?” asks USIP’s Scott Smith.

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What Has the U.S. Got Against Peace Talks?

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Wednesday, November 6, 2019

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To Protect Afghan Women’s Rights, U.S. Must Remain Engaged

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It’s been over a year since the U.S., led by Amb. Zalmay Khalilzad, opened talks with the Taliban aimed at ending the 18-year war. Over that year, Afghan women have demanded a seat at the negotiating table, worried that the hard-won gains made over the last two decades could be in jeopardy. Even with the peace process stalled, “it is vital that the U.S. remain engaged” to ensure that Afghan women’s rights are protected, said Rep. Martha Roby (R-AL) last week at the U.S. Institute of Peace’s latest Bipartisan Congressional Dialogue.

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Scott Worden on Afghan Elections and the Peace Process

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Wednesday, October 9, 2019

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A week and a half after Afghan presidential polls, the results remain unclear. But, we do know that turnout was historically low, largely due to dire security conditions. Meanwhile, with the peace process stalled, USIP’s Scott Worden says the upsurge in U.S. military operations against the Taliban is a “pressure tactic, not a victory strategy.”

Electoral Violence; Democracy & Governance; Peace Processes

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