This event has been postponed to a later date. Please check back for updated information.

Iraq continues to struggle with the heavy human legacy of the conflict with ISIS, with over 1.2 million internally displaced Iraqis and some 240,000 Syrian refugees. These individuals face significant humanitarian and protection needs, with those who are or perceived to be affiliated with ISIS presenting the most complicated cases. Meanwhile, COVID-19 and Iraq’s financial crisis are exacerbating their socioeconomic vulnerabilities. With camp closures occurring in recent months, ensuring the safety and sustainability of displaced persons’ return and reintegration is crucial.

A view of the Hassan Sham displacement camp from the bank of Great Zab River that divides administrative regions of Iraq and Kurdistan, east of Mosul, Iraq, Nov. 17, 2016. (Sergey Ponomarev/The New York Times)
A view of the Hassan Sham displacement camp from the bank of Great Zab River that divides administrative regions of Iraq and Kurdistan, east of Mosul, Iraq, Nov. 17, 2016. (Sergey Ponomarev/The New York Times)

This event has been postponed to a later date. Please check back for updated information.

Join USIP for a discussion with Iraq’s Minister of Migration and Displacement Evan Jabro on the current situation of Iraqi displaced communities — including ethnic and religious minorities and those at Al-Hol camp — as well as the challenges to their safe return, signs of progress, and Iraqi government plans for the future.

Join the conversation on Twitter with #EvanJabroUSIP.

Speakers

Lise Grande, welcoming remarks 
President and CEO, U.S. Institute of Peace

Minister Evan Faeq Jabro
Minister of Migration and Displacement of the Republic of Iraq

Sarhang Hamasaeed, moderator
Director, Middle East Programs, U.S. Institute of Peace

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