Due to the rapidly evolving Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) situation, as of Monday, March 16 and until further notice, in practicing prevention and in consideration of the well-being of our team and guests, USIP is postponing all public events.

USIP continues to closely monitor the rapidly evolving situation to determine when all public engagement at our headquarters can resume. Please check the event page frequently for updates.

Deputy Secretary-General Amina Mohammed (centre left) and Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka (centre right), Executive Director of UN Women, visit a camp for internally displaced people (IDPs) in Kabul, Afghanistan. (UN Photos)
Deputy Secretary-General Amina Mohammed (centre left) and Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka (centre right), Executive Director of UN Women, visit a camp for internally displaced people (IDPs) in Kabul, Afghanistan. (UN Photos)

The Global Fragility Act of 2019 (GFA) aims to stabilize conflict-affected areas and prevent violence and fragility around the world. The GFA requires the establishment of a comprehensive, integrated, ten-year Global Fragility Strategy by the president, in coordination with U.S. government departments and agencies. The GFA also requires that the Global Fragility Strategy be developed in consultation with a wide range of stakeholders and appropriate congressional committees. USIP is partnering with these stakeholders, including the Civil Society Coalition on the GFA, to convene a one-day workshop that will give leading experts a chance to share their perspectives with the U.S. government, and for U.S. government officials to articulate the stakeholder consultation process and timeline, as well as highlight the GFA.

Join USIP, U.S. government departments and agencies, and other stakeholders for this keystone event in the broader U.S. Global Fragility Strategy consultation process. This timely discussion will bring together thought leaders and practitioners from across the peacebuilding, development, democracy and governance, and security communities. Together, they will explore the elements of a successful U.S. government strategy, as well as lessons learned by the international community that should guide the U.S. government’s approach to fragility.

Join the conversation on Twitter with #GFAStrategy.

Agenda

9:30am - 9:35am: Welcome Remarks

  • The Honorable Nancy Lindborg
    President & CEO, U.S. Institute of Peace

9:35am - 9:50am: Remarks

  • Mr. Stephen E. Biegun
    Deputy Secretary of State, U.S. Department of State

9:50am - 10:00am: Remarks

  • Senior Representative
    U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID)

10:00am - 10:45am: Remarks & Fireside Chat with Members of Congress

  • The Honorable Nancy Lindborg, moderator
    President & CEO, U.S. Institute of Peace
  • Panelists TBD

10:45am - 12:00pm: International Partnership & Coordination Panel Discussion

  • Panelists TBD

12:00pm - 1:00pm: Congressional Perspectives on GFA Implementation

Introductory Remarks

  • Mr. Thomas A. Alexander
    Assistant Secretary of Defense for Special Operations/Low Intensity Conflict, U.S. Department of Defense

Remarks and Fireside Chat

  • Panelists TBD

Please check back soon for full list of speakers.

Related Publications

Amid Global Coronavirus Outbreak, What About Refugees?

Amid Global Coronavirus Outbreak, What About Refugees?

Wednesday, March 18, 2020

By: Fouad Pervez

With COVID-19 officially labelled a global pandemic, the focus for many countries has turned toward protecting their most vulnerable populations. But what about camps for refugees and internally displaced persons (IDPs)? Many camps lack the resources to maintain their already poor infrastructure, and the threat of a COVID-19 outbreak puts millions of displaced persons in a dangerous position. USIP’s Fouad Pervez looks at the unique risks that COVID-19 poses to refugees and IDPs, the impact an outbreak among these groups would have on the global pandemic, and what the international community can do to protect them.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Fragility & Resilience; Global Policy

The Role of Aid and Development in the Fight Against Extremism

The Role of Aid and Development in the Fight Against Extremism

Tuesday, February 4, 2020

By: Leanne Erdberg Steadman

Extremist groups thrive in fragile states where basic needs go unmet. Development efforts can address the conditions that make people vulnerable to extremism. If you look at a map of where terrorist groups operate and where terrorist attacks occur, you will find that many coincide with locations of intractable conflict and deep development deficits. Low human development indicators, stark disparities in opportunity and access to resources, poor or scattered governance, and a history of conflict and social marginalization feature prominently among afflicted communities.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Violent Extremism; Fragility & Resilience

The Global Fragility Act: A New U.S. Approach

The Global Fragility Act: A New U.S. Approach

Wednesday, January 15, 2020

By: USIP Staff

After several years of efforts by a bipartisan group of members of Congress and outside groups, Congress last month took legislative aim at a threat behind many of the world’s most pressing problems: fragile states. On December 20, as part of an appropriations package, President Donald Trump signed into law the Global Fragility Act, marking a new—if largely unnoticed— U.S. approach to conflict-prone states that can be vectors of violent extremism, uncontrolled migration, and extreme poverty.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Fragility & Resilience; Violent Extremism

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